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I would like to know that:

1.) I often see Chinese news paper use "China's", however I am not sure is it proper English or not ?? I believe there is China and Chinese in English but no China's, am I right?

Example: China's official Xinhua news agency says eight children were killed

2.)What tense should I use when I refer to literature, Person and Theory?

Such as:

The New York Times (state/stated) that the pollution level has reached the historical high level.

Freeman(1984) (state/stated) that Stakeholder theory attempts to ascertain which groups are ................

The Stakeholder theory (state/stated) that there are other parties involved, including governmental bodies, political groups........
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1) You form this type of possessive by adding an apostrophe and 's' . China's is correct. It means something belonging to China. China's news agency - the news agency of China. China's children - the children of China. China's population - the population of China.

2) Either 'states' or 'stated' could be correct. It depends whether you are talking about the present or past.
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Thank you for your reply.

For the question 2, I am talking about the Present but I refer back to some literature, person speech or theory, the issue I discussing is present however the thing I refer to is past. So......could you explain a little bit further?

For example:
The New York Times (state/stated) that the pollution level has reached the historical high level.

Freeman(1984) (state/stated) that Stakeholder theory attempts to ascertain which groups are ................

The Stakeholder theory (state/stated) that there are other parties involved, including governmental bodies, political groups........
Hi,

I hope some other people will give you more answers but let me try to clear some of your possible doubts on the first sentence of your example.

The New York Times (state/stated) that the pollution level has reached the historical high level.

I think it is saying that the New York Times stated in the past that something that has some relevance to you presently (look at the present perfect tense in the your original sentence).