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Suppose you are in grade 4, what do you call those in grade 5 and those in grade 2?

In other words, what do you call those who study in a higher grade and in a lower grade respectively?

I hope I have made myself understood.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
"Tom was a year behind me in school, and Mary was a year ahead of me."

That way is perfectly acceptable to me as a native speaker of BrE but so is the junior and senior terminology. It is not confusing to me because we don't use those terms for specific years at any stage. They can be used as comparatives at any stage in the education system, in a career or in life.

They used to be used specifically in the professions. such as law or medicine, to indicate positions in the 'firms'.
Do you mean that, if I graduated from a unversity in 2003, Tom in 2001, and Mary in 2006, then I can say Tom is my senior and Mary is my junior?
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Hi,

I've never said it that way, because it seems unnatural to me. If I had to, I'd say Tom was 2 years ahead of me and Mary was 3 years behind me.

But I hope you realize that it's not something that seems to come up as a common topic of conversation. In the culture I live in, people don't usually seem to care much about this after a few years have elapsed.

Best wishes, Clive
There are several ways of saying this and various examples have been given. All of these are equally valid in my opinion.

I wouldn't say this:

Do you mean that, if I graduated from a unversity in 2003, Tom in 2001, and Mary in 2006, then I can say Tom is my senior and Mary is my junior?

But I might say :
if I graduated from a unversity in 2003, Tom in 2001, and Mary in 2006, then I can say Tom was senior to me at university and Mary was junior to me?

Lawyers or solicitors in chambers, so I believe, still use the terminology senior and junior to refer to anyone who joined that particular chambers either before or after them respectively. I'm sure that in the firm of Abercrombie, Ffoulkes, Awl and Sundry, Awl and Sundry would refer to Abercrombie as their senior partner, whereas Abercrombie and Ffoulkes would look upon Awl and Sundry as their juniors.

I was suggesting that these terms are acceptable in certain structures and are possibly the nearest that you will get to a one-word term in such situations, maybe not in AmE but in BrE.
Sorry, I thought I was automatically logged-in before posting the previous comments, so anonymous in the above case should be Alan.es
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Thank you very much, Clive and Alan.es.