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Which is correct?

-- in two weeks time

-- in two weeks' time

Thank you!
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time of two weeks... therefore, "in two weeks' time" is correct
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The second is correct. Otherwise, just use in two weeks.
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 Anonymous's reply was promoted to an answer.
How about "in two-week time"? Is it also correct and common?
MapleHow about "in two-week time"? Is it also correct and common?
Neither correct nor common. Question has already been answered (twice) above. Emotion: smile
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Maple, you can refer to a two-week period, or a two-week holiday, but not "in two-week time."
Grammar GeekMaple, you can refer to a two-week period, or a two-week holiday, but not "in two-week time."
Thanks you!Emotion: smile[C]
Thank you)))
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I believe it's "two weeks' time"..in Britain. However, in the US it's more common to just say "in two weeks". My public radio station broadcasts the BBC every night and it drives me crazy when they add "time" to every statement of time. It's redundant!!! "Two weeks" is a measure of time, so the Brits DON'T need to add "time" every instance that they mention a period of time.
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