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Hi all,

I was wondering if someone can help me please.

I recently had a meeting with my HR manager who is irish.

I prepared a document to summarise the work i have done during the last 2 years.

Unfortunately the title of this document was "end of two years contract".

He has corrected this firt sentence (I was so ashame) twice:

- he removed the "s" at years. is there any reason for that?

- he changed the sentence to "two year contract review". was my version incorrect? was it not polite?

Thanks a million for the great help you give to everyone.

Sebi
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Hi,

I was wondering if someone can help me please.

I recently had a meeting with my HR manager who is irish.

I prepared a document to summarise the work i have done during the last 2 years.

Unfortunately the title of this document was "end of two years contract".

He has corrected this firt sentence (I was so ashame) twice:

- he removed the "s" at years. is there any reason for that?

- he changed the sentence to "two year contract review". was my version incorrect?

was it not polite? No, there was nothing impolite about it.

Always believe what Irish people say about English. I'm Irish myself. Emotion: big smile

The title you chose did not actually say what the document was. Your boss chose to call it a review. You could also call it a summary. Or even just a report. That way, the reader of the title understands better what the document is.

In your title, you are using 'two years' as an adjective. Such adjectives normally use the singular form. They are also commonly hyphenated.

eg We don't say 'a five-tons truck'. We say 'a five-ton truck'.

eg eg We don't say 'a twenty-years mortgage'. We say 'a twenty-year mortgage'.

If you'll permit me to say so, I think you are getting a bit too worriedd about what seems to be quite a minor matter.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Thanks a million Clive,

Your explanation is very clear. It is a pity we don't have irish teacher in France to teach us english...

Thanks again

Robbie