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hello experts

I agree with you [that spaghetti sauce can never have too much garlic].

What type of clause is the bracketed part and what grammatical functions does it assume?

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I agree with you [that spaghetti sauce can never have too much garlic].

The bracketed bit is declarative content clause, whose function is complement of "agree".

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thanks a lot

What is the function of "with you" then?

Does "agree" have two complements?

anonymous

What is the function of "with you" then?

Does "agree" have two complements?

Yes: the PP "with you" and the content clause are both complements of "agree".

It's quite common for a verb to have two complements:

She informed me that she had been insulted.


Here, the direct object "me" and the content clause are both complements of "informed".

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Thanks.

Is the following sentence the same in structure as the oroginal sentence?

They agreed [to the proposal] [that an ad be placed in the newspaper]?

They agreed to [the proposal that an ad be placed in the newspaper].


No: the bracketed noun phrase is complement of "to", but the underlined content clause is complement of "proposal".