+0

In the following sentence what is the verb? Apart from "have been". You know the structure of the sentence is unclear!

The economic opening of countries that have traditionally been minor players in another.

+1
jalehIn the following sentence

It is not a sentence. There is no main clause. You can analyse it as a noun phrase.

+0
jalehIn the following sentence what is the verb?

be

jalehApart from "have been"

There is none; 'be' is the 'main' verb.

jalehYou know the structure of the sentence is unclear

Not at all! It is the meaning that is non-existent.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  

Could you please tell me the meaning of the phrase?

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
jaleh

Could you please tell me the meaning of the phrase?

It is impossible to tell exactly without more context. Is it quoted correctly?

The previous sentence is:

The general worldwide decline in trade barriers, such as customs duties and import quotas, is surely one explanation.

What lies behind this explosion in international commerce? The general worldwide decline in trade barriers, such as customs duties and import quotas, is surely one explanation. The economic opening of countries that have traditionally been minor players is another. (Your wrote "in" so the sentence had no main verb!)


Paraphrase:

Why has trading goods and services among counties increased so dramatically? One reason is that governments have lowered import tariffs and limits on the quantities imported. Another reason is that countries that didn't use to participate in international trade have opened their economies to the export-import market.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

Yes, you're right. sorry for my mistake!

The economic opening of countries that have traditionally been minor players is another.

in this expression, it wouldn't be better to write "the opening of the economic"? is "the economic opening" normal?!

jalehs "the economic opening" normal?

It is a good phrase, but not very common.

The (economic) opening of Japan was forced by Commodore Matthew Perry in 1853.