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Dear teachers,

Would you please tell me if the following sentences are correct? Please check the underlined elements and tell me if something else should be written instead.

1) a) We could hear (a) some roars / b) bursts / c) a roar of laughter (d) coming from the corridor.

2) Different jams were exposed on the market stalls.

3) Several toothpastes were distributed to the children.

4) a) Debris of glass b) was/were (?) scattered all over the floor.

5) Millions of a) sheeps were killed on the day of the b) Aïd El Kebir (spelling? = Muslim feast).

6) These a) types (?) / b) patterns of behaviour are unacceptable in such an institution.

7) I bought a lot of fruits in the market on Sunday.
(Do we say “a piece of fruit”? When is ‘fruit’ countable and when is it not?)

8) Two a) kits (?) / b) pieces of furniture will be delivered.

9) Some a) cubes / b) lumps / c) spoonfuls of sugar should be mixed with the flour.

10) Ten a) yards / b) metres of cloth are needed to upholster my sofa.

11) Two a) soaps / b) bars of soap will be provided.

(Is it possible to put "soap" in the plural?)

Thank you in advance.
All the best,
Hela

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Comments  (Page 2) 
Hi,

Sounds OK to me. You might also say 'pieces of food'.

Clive
Is it possible then to say that there are pieces of LEFTOVER food ON THE FLOOR.

Other than BITS OF STRAW is there another collocation?

See you!
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Hi,

Is it possible then to say that there are pieces of LEFTOVER food ON THE FLOOR. Yes.

Other than BITS OF STRAW is there another collocation? Yes, pieces.

We tend to use these words rather interchangeably. To me, bits suggest a little more the idea of 'random or broken'. eg if you dismantle an engine, you have a lot of pieces, but not really a lot of bits. If we speak carefully, which we don't always do.

Clive
Thanks Clive,

So there isn't a particular partitive for "straw" as there is the word BLADE for "grass"?
Hi,

Nothing that comes to mind right now.

However, we might say 'He stood in the barn door with a straw in his mouth', where we are focusing on just one specific straw and not a whole haystack.

Clive
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Sorry, I forgot this part.

Is it possible then to say that there are pieces of LEFTOVER food ON THE FLOOR.

Yes, I suppose so, but 'leftover food' usually refers to food that we will save until tomorrow and eat at another time.

Clive

Clive
Thank you very much, Clive.

Have a nice week,

Hela Emotion: smile