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"He signed the contract under threat of his life."
"He signed the contract under threat to his life."

Could the first one be wrong?
Comments  
SheltieBites"He signed the contract under threat of his life."
"He signed the contract under threat to his life."

Could the first one be wrong?
Very doubtful. Both are used.

CJ
Do they mean the same?
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SheltieBitesDo they mean the same?
They do to me. Yes.

CJ
1 "He signed the contract under threat of violence."
2 "He signed the contract under threat of his life."
3 "He signed the contract under threat of violence to his life."

In 1), violence could be done to him. In 2), there seems to be some ambiguity as to what could happen to his life. Could 3) be a better version of 2)?
http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/threat
According to sense 2b in the dictionary, "under threat of" suggests the possibility of something bad. "Violence" is something bad, but one's own life is not something bad. Something else must be done to one's life to be a threat.

In:

"under threat of violence"

violence = threat. But in:

"under threat of his life"

how is his life = threat?
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http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/threat
According to sense 2b in the dictionary, "under threat of" suggests the possibility of something bad. "Violence" is something bad, but one's own life is not something bad. Something else must be done to one's life to be a threat.

In:

"under threat of violence"

violence = threat. But in:

"under threat of his life"

how is his life = threat?

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SheltieBites1 "He signed the contract under threat of violence."2 "He signed the contract under threat of his life."3 "He signed the contract under threat of violence to his life."In 1), violence could be done to him. In 2), there seems to be some ambiguity as to what could happen to his life. Could 3) be a better version of 2)?
Yes. 3) is a paraphrase of 2) that makes the implicit meaning explicit.

CJ
SheltieBitesAccording to sense 2b in the dictionary, "under threat of" suggests the possibility of something bad. "Violence" is something bad, but one's own life is not something bad. Something else must be done to one's life to be a threat.

In:

"under threat of violence"

violence = threat. But in:

"under threat of his life"

how is his life = threat?
You may be trying to take too literal an approach. These ways of speaking are simply idiomatic usages. For example, if someone kicks the bucket, he's dead. But there's nothing intrinsically like dying in the literal act of kicking a bucket. These kinds of expressions may appear illogical or even nonsensical if you analyze them literal word by literal word.

CJ
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