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Hi,

I was wondering if the phonemes

-ng (like in 'ring')

-w ( like in 'wind')

-th ( like in 'this' and like in 'moth' )

are "exclusively English" ( = characteristic of only the English language)?

Do any other Germanic languages have phonemes like these?

Do any Romance languages have phonemes that are close enough to the English [th], [ng], [w]?

Sorry if my question lacks "academic precision/refinement"...

Awaiting your kind comments...

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vlivefI was wondering if the phonemes -ng (like in 'ring')-w ( like in 'wind')-th ( like in 'this' and like in 'moth' )are "exclusively English" ( = characteristic of only the English language)?

No, they're not exclusively English.
/ŋ/ also occurs in Chinese (péngyǒu - friend) and German (der Engel - the angel).
/θ/ also occurs in Greek and in Castilian Spanish.
[ð] is an allophone of /d/ in Spanish.
And /w/ occurs in French, of course (oui /wi/), and in Polish (Lutosławski).

vlivefDo any other Germanic languages have phonemes like these?

Besides the /ŋ/ in German, I don't know. I doubt it. I think Swedish has /w/, doesn't it? Emotion: tongue tied

vlivefDo any Romance languages have phonemes that are close enough to the English [th], [ng], [w]?

As mentioned above.

The /ŋ/ of English is also close to a sound heard in north-western Italian dialects. It's related to the nasalized vowels of French, e.g., /ɛ̃/.

CJ

Comments  

Super! Thanks a lot CalifJim!