I noticed in perusing my OED Online that the word "hubris" emerged initially in English as a form of university slang: 1884 Daily News 28 Oct. (Ware), Boys of good family, who have always been toadied, and never been checked, who are full of health and high spirits, develop what Academic slang knows as hubris, a kind of high-flown insolence.

The word "kudos" also originally emerged out of academic slang and I'm wondering if anybody knows of any other instances.
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Not exactly a slang:
Phi Beta Kappa (Society), from phi + beta + kappa, initials of the society's Greek motto philosophia biou kybernEtEs philosophy the guide of life
I noticed in perusing my OED Online that the word "hubris" emerged initially in English as a form of university ... high-flowninsolence. The word "kudos" also originally emerged out of academic slang andI'm wondering if anybody knows of any other instances.

I'm astounded by both examples. OED knows more than I could about the language of 1884; but I don't see how anybody could have studied Greek legend and tragedy without being familiar with the word "hubris". That must, I suppose, be how it got into university English. But "hubris" doesn't appear in OED1 at all; though the Dictionary dates "hubristic" to 1831 (and "kudos" to the same year from another source).
Partridge has both.
One other university slang word from Greek I can think of is "topos" for lavatory; though still around in the 1960s, this one didn't become widespread. Since it means "place", its interest for me is in providing a tenuous link to the theory that "loo" may come from French "lieu".
Mike.
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I noticed in perusing my OED Online that the word "hubris" emerged initially in English as a form of university ... The word "kudos" also originally emerged out of academic slang and I'm wondering if anybody knows of any other instances.

There are plenty of words that first appeared as university slang: "brunch", "crony", "bed-sitter", "cram" (for an exam), "rag" ('to tease, torment'), etc. But if you're looking for classical terms popularized among (British) students, there's "pax" (used to end a dispute) and "(the) hoi polloi" (used to mean 'candidates for a pass degree'). Also, the word "conundrum" may have originated "in some university joke, or as a parody of some Latin term of the schools", according to the OED.
One other university slang word from Greek

"Nous" is one that occurs to me.

Katy Jennison
spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @
I noticed in perusing my OED Online that the word ... and I'm wondering if anybody knows of any other instances.

There are plenty of words that first appeared as university slang: "brunch", "crony", "bed-sitter", "cram" (for an exam), "rag" ('to ... originated "in some university joke, or as a parody of some Latin term of the schools", according to the OED.

Ipse dixit?
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Ipse dixit?

As to that, res ipsa loquitur.
Mike.
I noticed in perusing my OED Online that the word ... and I'm wondering if anybody knows of any other instances.

There are plenty of words that first appeared as university slang: "brunch", "crony", "bed-sitter", "cram" (for an exam), "rag" ('to ... originated "in some university joke, or as a parody of some Latin term of the schools", according to the OED.

Rugger. Soccer. Brekkers.
the -er or -ers ending attached to a truncated version of a word is or was characteristic of Oxbridge slang.
as in Cuppers.

Keith Edgerley
Ist mir mîn leben getroumet, oder ist ez wâr?
There are plenty of words that first appeared as university ... some Latin term of the schools", according to the OED.

Rugger. Soccer. Brekkers. the -er or -ers ending attached to a truncated version of a word is or was characteristic of Oxbridge slang. as in Cuppers.

Another well-known one is "chum", which originally meant "roommate", an abbreviation of "chamber-fellow".
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