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This soda contains unnatural chemical flavors.

... artificial chemical spice/zest/seasoning.

Hi,

Does the second sound equally right as the first in the above and mean about the same to you? Thanks.
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No, if you say something has "unnatural chemical flavors" it tasts wrong. It may tate oddly acidic, or metalic.

I think you may mean that it contains artificial flavoring.

You would not use spice, zest, or seasoning for this. Flavor or flavoriing.
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Both would work in your original example.

Flaror is what you taste when you put something in your mouth. Flavoring is the stuff the manufacturer or cook puts in to make it taste that way.

Spice, zest, and seasoning are special categories of flavorings which would not normally be used in drinks - except nutmeg in eggnog, Worcestershire(sp?) in bull shots, and an assortment of other special recipies.

Edit. It might be a philosophical question as to whether the flavor is in the drink or in your mouth.

When I say both flavor and flavoring work in your original example, that's assuming you make GG's sugested corrections.
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Grammar Geek
No, if you say something has "unnatural chemical flavors" it tasts wrong. It may tate oddly acidic, or metalic.

I think you may mean that it contains artificial flavoring.

You would not use spice, zest, or seasoning for this. Flavor or flavoriing.

Thanks, GG.

To make sure, do both "artificial flavoring" and "artificial flavor" work? Are there any subtle nuances between "flavoring" and "flavor?"

By the way, why don't "spice/zest/seasoning" do the trick?
 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.
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