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Dear Friends,

He won't stop until she gives up.

He wouldn't stop until she gave up.

Is the first one present conditional and second past conditional? Is until used for conditional statements?

Thanks.

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anonymous

Dear Friends,

He won't stop until she gives up.

He wouldn't stop until she gave up.

Is the first one present conditional and second past conditional? Is until used for conditional statements? No.

Thanks.

The sequence of tenses is the same, but without an if-clause we don't call a sentence a conditional.

You are right, however, to see the similarity.

CJ

Comments  
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Thanks, CJ.

I'd like to add something to what the teacher said. Typically If clause is used in conditional sentences. It's a very common rule that you will find lots of websites talking about it. It has different types including zero conditional, first conditional, second conditional, third conditional, and mix conditional. All of them must have IF clause.

Moreover, you know that there are many sentences that are not defined as conditional due to omitting the IF clause, but they have implied conditional due to the existence of the result clause. When you read them, you'll find it obvious that they have conditional connotations. There are lots of examples of them online such as the following link. I suggest you read up:

Implied conditional free online english grammar lessons and games (mikeandcate.com)


In addition, I don't know whether you know that there are other expressions to express conditional in the sentences such as unless, should, as long as.

If you're interested, read the link below carefully:

Conditionals: other expressions ( unless, should, as long as ) - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary

Honestly, there are some expressions that are not familiar to me, and I find them difficult to be used as conditional. I don't even hear them.

For example:

Had I known you were waiting outside, I would have invited you to come in. (If I had known you were waiting outside …)

Should you wish to cancel your order, please contact our customer service department on 02317 6658932. (or If you should wish to cancel your order …)


The first sentence is confusing in both examples while the second one is obvious.

Regarding until, actually I do not find it in the expressions above, but they mentioned unless. Although unless and until are different, they are close in meaning. When I google them, I find out that they are subordinating conjunctions, which have conditional connotations, so that they are quite easily misconstructed.

Ultimately, this topic "conditional" is wide, but there are a lot of good resources and examples.