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Further negotiations with Zimbabwe are delayed until Friday, (let's say I want to add something, what's the right transition) until the ambassador for Kenya comes back from the US.

Is the above correct?
Thanks.
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You don't want two until clauses like that, unless you insert that is, meaning they both refer to the same time.
delayed until Friday.
delayed until the ambassador returns.
delayed until Friday, that is, until the ambassador returns.
delayed until the ambassador returns on Friday.
But not: delayed until Friday until the ambassador returns.
CJ
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Is it acceptable in casual speech, at least?
No.
New2grammarIs it acceptable in casual speech, at least?
Only if there's a fairly long pause before the second until clause. The pause will be interpreted as that is.
CJ
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CalifJimOnly if there's a fairly long pause before the second until clause. The pause will be interpreted as that is.
That's what I thought because the reporter did that. However, when I transcribed the line I got misinterpreted. I guess I didn't use the right punctuation. How do you represent a long pause? a dash or three dots.

Thanks.