What is a synonym of "untrained" in the following sentence, which I guess is used in a positive sense?
She sang folk songs on the street. She had a sweet, untrained voice genuine talent.
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What is a synonym of "untrained" in the following sentence, which I guess is used in a positive sense? She sang folk songs on the street. She had a sweet, untrained voice genuine talent.

"Untrained" in that sentence is a transferred epithet. The singer had received no formal training in singing. Literally, then, what is untrained is the singer. By attaching "untrained" to "voice," the writer is saying that the voice is that of an untrained singer.

Bob Lieblich
Untrained in many things
What is a synonym of "untrained" in the following sentence, ... on the street. She had a sweet, untrained voice genuine talent.

"Untrained" in that sentence is a transferred epithet. The singer had received no formal training in singing. Literally, then, what is untrained is the singer. By attaching "untrained" to "voice," the writer is saying that the voice is that of an untrained singer.

But in this context it is meant as a compliment.

Mike Nitabach
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"Untrained" in that sentence is a transferred epithet. The singer ... saying that the voice is that of an untrained singer.

But in this context it is meant as a compliment.

Can I think it can be paraphrased with "natural" or "simple"?
But in this context it is meant as a compliment.

Can I think it can be paraphrased with "natural" or "simple"?

Forgive the flippancy, but there's a point to it: You can think anything you want to.
What you are really asking, I assume, is whether "untrained" means the same as "natural" or "simple." The answer is that you need context to tell you. In the quotation you give, it is clear that the speaker admires the singer and her singing, so in this context the term "untrained" is plainly a compliment and does indicate "natural" or "simple." But in another context it might mean something quite different; for example: "John tried to compete in the singing competition, but he had an untrained voice and sounded very bad in comparison with the trained singers."
English is like that. The same word can be flattering or insulting, depending on context.

Bob Lieblich
Sometimes flattering, sometimes ...
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}>>>What is a synonym of "untrained" in the following sentence, which I }>>>guess is used in a positive sense?
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}>>>She sang folk songs on the street. She had a sweet, untrained }>>>voice genuine talent.
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}>>"Untrained" in that sentence is a transferred epithet. The singer }>>had received no formal training in singing. Literally, then, what }>>is untrained is the singer. By attaching "untrained" to "voice," }>>the writer is saying that the voice is that of an untrained singer. }>
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}> But in this context it is meant as a compliment. }>
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} Can I think it can be paraphrased with "natural" or "simple"?

"Natural", yes; it links "sweet" with "talent". "Simple" is not as good, because it reinforces "sweet" without indicating any talent and possibly indicating a lack of it. But it's in the right ballpark.

R. J. Valentine
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Masahiko:

Bob Leiblich:

That is what the writer is saying, but I don't read it as a transferred epithet. When the teacher trains the singer, I would say that at the same time the singer is training her own voice. So if the singer is untrained, then her voice is also untrained.
Michael Nitabach:
But in this context it is meant as a compliment.

Right. That's because she's able to sound good even without training.

Masahiko:
Can I think it can be paraphrased with "natural" or "simple"?

I see two interpretations, depending on how the speaker feels about voice training. If the speaker thinks that voice training is a good thing that every singer should do, then "untrained" can't be replaced in this way. Someone who feels that way would be more likely to use a word like "but" or although" "a sweet, but untrained, voice" but they might not.
On the other hand, if the speaker thinks that voice training removes some desirable natural qualities from the voice, then "natural" is an excellent paraphrase. And in this case "sweet, untrained voice" is the more likely wording, so probably this is the intended reading.
Mark Brader > "I had never thought of Jesus as being (Email Removed) > a variety of grape plant, but Toronto > if you put it that way..." Jan Sand

My text in this article is in the public domain.
What is a synonym of "untrained" in the following sentence, ... on the street. She had a sweet, untrained voice genuine talent.

"Untrained" in that sentence is a transferred epithet. The singer had received no formal training in singing. Literally, then, what is untrained is the singer. By attaching "untrained" to "voice," the writer is saying that the voice is that of an untrained singer.

OK, it's a little bit archaic now, in the sense that one doesn't hear it very often anymore, but what about "artless"?
RobertE
"Untrained" in that sentence is a transferred epithet. The singer ... saying that the voice is that of an untrained singer.

OK, it's a little bit archaic now, in the sense that one doesn't hear it very often anymore, but what about "artless"?

"Artless" would have worked very well in the quoted sentence. When "untrained" is used negatively, I wouldn't use "artless" in its place.
RobertE

I feel like I'm talking to myself.

Robert E. Lieblich
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