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Hi.

1) Would you say somebody is up and coming, or something is up and coming? I wouldn't say somebody is up and coming but I would say something is up and coming meaning it is scheduled to take place soon, not that something is likely to be successful.

2) Could "up-and-comer" be used for a non-human? This product is an up-and-comer --- does this make sense? You wouldn't say "this product is a comer," would you?

Best,

Hiro
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Hi Hiro,

1) Would you say somebody is up and coming, or something is up and coming? I wouldn't say somebody is up and coming but I would say something is up and coming meaning it is scheduled to take place soon, not that something is likely to be successful. You could use it in both cases, but I'd say it is much more commonly used of a person.

2) Could "up-and-comer" be used for a non-human? This product is an up-and-comer --- does this make sense? Yes, I understand your meaning. You wouldn't say "this product is a comer," would you? No, I don't think 'a comer' is a common expression for a thing. But, 'an up and comer' is not a common exprssion, either. usually, the phrase 'up and coming' is used.

Best wishes, Clive
Clive

I have heard the words 'up-and-coming' in sports. He is an up-and-coming cricketer.

Would you use it in sports?
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Hi,

Yes. And in many other areas, too.

Then there's the matter of the opposite meaning. Possibly something like 'fading'.

Clive
Clive1) Would you say somebody is up and coming, or something is up and coming? I wouldn't say somebody is up and coming but I would say something is up and coming meaning it is scheduled to take place soon, not that something is likely to be successful. You could use it in both cases, but I'd say it is much more commonly used of a person.

Hi, Clive.

The construction, "something is up and coming" --- what does it mean, thriving or scheduled for the near future?

Thanks.

Hiro/ Sendai, Japan
Hi,

The construction, "something is up and coming" --- what does it mean, thriving or scheduled for the near future?

It's more common for a person than a thing. It means the person is rising in significance, and will probably be an important or successful person in the future. For a business, the meaning is similar. I guess you could say 'begining to thrive'.

If something is coming up or upcoming, it means it will happen in the near future.

Best wishes, Clive
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hi,

I have several times come to that as the TV/Radio announcer is about to introduce the next program and or an event to happe in the near future.