Hi, there,
Can anybody tell me what "up close and personal" means? I couldn't find this phrase in my dictionary.
In addition, in Asia, there have been more and more apartments which are divided into two floors in order to create more space to live in. I am wondering what this kind of apartment is called in English? Does "loft" refer to the upper level of the apartment only? Or does "loft" refer to this kind of apartment which is divided into two floors? What is the difference between "Loft" and" attic"? Thanks in advance!
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Hi, there, Can anybody tell me what "up close and personal" means? I couldn't find this phrase in my dictionary.

It means first-hand knowledge, in perhaps an aggressive and/or overwhelming way. Often, it means gaining this knowledge deliberately.
In addition, in Asia, there have been more and more apartments which are divided into two floors in order to create more space to live in. I am wondering what this kind of apartment is called in English?

I'm not sure I've ever seen an apartment divided in this manner. In my house, this would create spaces that even children would find cramped.
Does "loft" refer to the upper level of the apartment only? Or does "loft" refer to this kind of apartment which is divided into two floors?

A loft is an elevated structure, typically some sort of platform extending from wall to wall, contained in a larger structure. Haybarns canonically have lofts where unbaled hay is stored. I've seen "loft beds" installed in large walk-in closets, creating a sleeping area above an area used for storing clothes. There is a style of apartments, somewhat popular in San Francisco, called "lofts" these have extremely high ceilings in the living/dining/kitchen areas, and an upper level, open to below, for sleeping. These are typically above some of the living area (though sometimes the elevated area is above a second bedroom.)
What is the difference between "Loft" and" attic"?

A "loft" is an elevated area of a structure, open to the areas below. An "attic" is the upper level of a structure, and isn't typically designed for everyday use. It is also typically closed off from the areas below. (Often, an attic isn't even insulated or "finished" with flooring or interior walls.)
Adam Maass
Hi, there, Can anybody tell me what "up close and personal" means? I couldn't find this phrase in my dictionary.

I can't offer a good-enough answer without some example of its use. There are different meanings for different situations. Context, please.
In addition, in Asia, there have been more and more apartments which are divided into two floors in order to create more space to live in. I am wondering what this kind of apartment is called in English?

Townhouse?
Does "loft" refer to the upper level of the apartment only? Or does "loft" refer to this kind of apartment which is divided into two floors? What is the difference between "Loft" and" attic"?

The loft is the upper area of an apartment accessible, usually, by a ladder of sorts. There are "loft apartments" which, in my experience, have various layout designs. It seems to me, at least where I live, the term "loft apartment" is a way to charge more money for a living space downtown.
Lofts are for living and attics are for storing things. BTJM

Nate
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Can anybody tell me what "up close and personal" means? I couldn't find this phrase in my dictionary.

There is a film with that name. I have not seen it so I can't get the reference it sounds like a quote or part of one from a classical source. I would guess it means the degree of familiarity one might have woth a third party as in:
"I do know him but not up close and ..."
In addition, in Asia, there have been more and more apartments which are divided into two floors in order to create more space to live in. what this kind of apartment is called in English?

A maisonette.
Does "loft" refer to the upper level of the apartment only? Or does "loft" refer to this kind of apartment which is divided into two floors? What is the difference between "Loft" and" attic"?

Attic and loft mean more or less the same thing. A loft would have been built with the intention of housing something between the living quarters and the roof. Hence an hay loft.
Attic, I imagine comes from Greek architectural terms. Probably what a Greek farmer would store hay in. Today it refers to roof spaces not designed to do more than close the structure off cheaply. Converting one usually requires major reinforcing for the floor and etc.

In northern latitudes water can be a problem all the year around and buildings are designed to shed them asap with little or no facility for storage.
Latin was widely used among tradesmen before the British Empire invented another international language. Some building terms don't have an original English term. The Latin was incorporated.
Hi, there, Can anybody tell me what "up close and personal" means? I couldn't find this phrase in my dictionary.

The first time I remember hearing it was in television coverage of the Olympics, probably 1972. The announcer used it to introduce biographical pieces about the various hopeful contenders "And now, here's a look at Mark Spitz Up Close And Personal!"
So it means, this story will look at the athlete closely and show his or her personal life (family, job...).
Later the phrase was used as the name of a Hollywood movie.

Best Donna Richoux
In Asia, there have been more and more apartments which ... two floors? What is the difference between "Loft" and" attic"?

The loft is the upper area of an apartment accessible, usually, by a ladder of sorts. There are "loft apartments" ... more money for a living space downtown. Lofts are for living and attics are for storing things. BTJM Nate

Maybe this is true for modern buildings, but certainly not for older ones. In a wealthy person's multi-storey town house, the attics were where the servants lived. They would be reached by a narrow but proper staircase, not a ladder. The cheap ones had a skylight, and decent ones had a dormer window (the kind which pokes out of the roof). The space immediately under the roof is called a loft when it is uninhabitable, because it has either no window, or unfinished walls and/or floor, or a ladder instead of a staircase.

Yes, I have gathered that "loft" has acquired a new connotation in modern conversions to blocks of flats, but I think it's inconsistent with its older usage.
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Hi, there, Can anybody tell me what "up close and personal" means? I couldn't find this phrase in my dictionary. ... kind of apartment which is divided into two floors? What is the difference between "Loft" and" attic"? Thanks in advance![/nq]In my BrE dialect, "loft" and "attic" are synonymous. Both refer to an area at the top of a house or building which probably has restricted access and usage. It is commonly between the ceiling of the highest usable room and the roof. It may be difficult to get to and cramped inside. Common uses are nothing or storage of rarely used items. We store old documents and Christmas decorations in ours. Ours is so small that only a small child can stand in it and only in the centre.

Some people adapt their loft / attic to be more accessible and usable. Probably it should cease to be called a loft or attic in these cases but usually it retains its name. In my own house, we are inconsistent about "loft" and "attic" and use different ones at different times. I would not deduce anything about accessibility and usage from the choice of the word.
As others have said, loft seems to have gained a new meaning in some apartments. In the examples that I have seen, the apartment has quite a high ceiling but there is a partial second floor. Typically this partial floor is for bedrooms. The arrangement can look nice but seems wasteful. If the height permits a partial second floor, it would permit a complete second floor and even more floor area.

"Up close and personal" sounds rather American but it is heard and used here a bit. I am most familiar with it as a description of a celebrity interview. It is claiming that you will get much more detailed information that usual. It is sometimes used in a wider context to suggest excessively or unpleasantly close. =20

Se=E1n O'Leathl=F3bhair
The loft is the upper area of an apartment accessible, ... living and attics are for storing things. BTJM Nate

Maybe this is true for modern buildings, but certainly not for older ones. In a wealthy person's multi-storey town house, ... acquired a new connotation in modern conversions to blocks of flats, but I think it's inconsistent with its older usage.

It's not so much 'older' usage, but a difference between BrE usage and AmE usage. Nate's statement "Lofts are for living and attics are for storing things" is AmE usage, and Bert's description shows the BrE usage. Unfortunately, the AmE usage is now creeping into Britain, with apartments in converted warehouses (e.g. in London Docklands) being described as 'lofts' when they are nothing of the sort.
In addition, in Asia, there have been more and more ... wondering what this kind of apartment is called in English?

Townhouse?

In BrBE (British Builders' English) an apartment which is on two or more floors, but which does not occupy all the floors of a building, is a maisonette. An apartment on a single floor is a flat (because it's flat!).
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