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Have you heard anything about that shoplifter who was up for twenty-five years?
You ever hear what happened to that guy who was up for twenty-five years on the three strikes law?

In these examples, does 'was up for' mean 'was sentenced to'?
Thanks
LiJ
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Hi,

Have you heard anything about that shoplifter who was up for twenty-five years?



You ever hear what happened to that guy who was up for twenty-five years on the three strikes law?

In these examples, does 'was up for' mean 'was sentenced to'? No. It means that the possible sentence was 25 years.

Best wishes, Clive
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Got it!
In the whole context I have, your explanation makes sense perfectly.
Thanks, Clive.
CliveHi,

Have you heard anything about that shoplifter who was up for twenty-five years?



You ever hear what happened to that guy who was up for twenty-five years on the three strikes law?

In these examples, does 'was up for' mean 'was sentenced to'? No. It means that the possible sentence was 25 years.

Best wishes, Clive

Hi,
Does that mean prosecutors have demanded a 25 year prison term for this guy?
Thanks.
LiveinjapanDoes that mean prosecutors have demanded a 25 year prison term for this guy?
That is not possible to know from your sentences alone. Also, "to be up for" is colloquial so it would not be used in any official context.
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I understand when to use this expression, and that would be the same as in my native language when translating it.
Thanks, Huevos.