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Mrs. Cake: Now Pinkie Pie, are you sure you're up for baking the muffins and running the store this afternoon?

I looked the meaning of up for up and found that means want to do, and that brought up the next question.

If the up for is replaced into want to and the sentence turns into "are you sure you want to bake the muffins and run the store this afternoon?", is the meaning of it completely same as that of the original sentence? Or some change of nuance occurs? Thanks in advance!


The sentence is an excerpt from http://mlp.wikia.com/wiki/Transcripts/Applebuck_Season

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PonyFanIf the up for is replaced into want to and the sentence turns into "are you sure you want to bake the muffins and run the store this afternoon?", is the meaning of it completely same as that of the original sentence?

Roughly, yes, but 'up to' also means 'feel capable of'.