+0
"I'm not really up to that."

1. Does the quote mean "I'm not ready for it yet?"

2. Can I say, "I'm really up to that" to mean "I'm ready for it?"

3. Is it a common usage of 'up to sth.'?

Thanks,
1 2
Comments  
It could mean a lot of things. Could you please give us the context in which this sentence was written?
FYI

be up to. Be able to do or deal with, as in When I got home, she asked if I was up to a walk on the beach. This usage is often put negatively, that is, not be up to something, as in He's not up to a long drive. [Late 1700s] (dictionary.com)
Try out our live chat room.
Hello M2L

1. Does the quote mean "I'm not ready for it yet?"

— it means 'I'm not capable of doing that at the moment'. You might say it if you were ill, and someone suggested a 20 mile run.

2. Can I say, "I'm really up to that" to mean "I'm ready for it?"

— no; but you can say 'I'm up for that', to mean 'I'm extremely keen on doing that!'

It's more common as a question, though; for instance, someone might say, 'MrQ and I are going for a drink tonight. Are you up for it?' Here, it means 'does that appeal to you too?'

3. Is it a common usage of 'up to sth.'?

Yes; you also have 'to get up to something': either, especially of children, 'to do something mischievous'; or simply 'to do'. For instance, 'What did you get up to at the weekend?'

MrP
Hi MrP,

Once I was told a joke by my previous co-worker.

A: "What are you up to?"

B: "I'm up to 6 3" (i.e. 6'3")

__________

How come 'up to' has quite a few different meanings?

Thanks for the reply.
MeantolearnHi MrP,

Once I was told a joke by my previous co-worker.

A: "What are you up to?"

B: "I'm up to 6 3" (i.e. 6'3")

Emotion: smile

As for the different meanings...When English is at a loss for an expression, it takes a common verb (give, take, get, etc.), and sticks random prepositions and adverbs at the end. The resulting string is then called a 'phrasal verb' and used to torment foreign students of English.

It keeps the ESL publishing industry busy, though.

MrP
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Is it OK to greet people, "what are you up to?" to mean "what are you busy at?" Is it polite to say so?

Thanks,

___________

up to - spoken (English) doing something secret or something that you should not be doing:

e.g. The children are very quiet. I wonder what they're up to. (Longman)

up to - occupied with, engaged in, as in What have you been up to lately? (dictionary.com)
Hello M2

"What are you up to?" might sound a little policeman-like, as a greeting; "what have you been up to?" is more usual.

But it's quite a familiar greeting: you'd only use it with someone you knew well.

MrP
Along the same lines: Don't ask someone reading what they are up to. They may say "Page 154".
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more