1 2 3 4 5
Rey:
Best wishes for you all, Bill, and special greetings to your beautiful and smart wife and son No. 2.

Who's Bill?
Who's Bill?

The Forty-Second President. AKA Elvis.
Also my brother.

Liebs
Who's Bob
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Reinhold (Rey) Aman wrote on 07 Aug 2004:
"My wife just hit someobdy with the car and broke ... with them. She's a bit hysterical and I should drive."

Best wishes for you all, Bill, and special greetings to your beautiful and smart wife and son No. 2.

Thank you, Rey.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Django Cat wrote on 07 Aug 2004:
My previous remarks about this were: "My wife just hit ... she didn't call the police. It's 1:40 a.m. Taiwan time.

Echoing CJ Franke, hope all works out.

Thank you, DC.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Skitt wrote on 07 Aug 2004:
"My wife just hit someobdy with the car and broke ... with them. She's a bit hysterical and I should drive."

Not only that, she neeeds your presence to reassure her.

She is not one who is easily reassured, I can assure you. I also thought of that and I did my best. She's calmer today.
I hope everything turns out as well as can be expected.

Thank you, Alec. I have every confidence that it will.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Harvey Van Sickle wrote on 07 Aug 2004:
On 06 Aug 2004, CyberCypher wrote snip

It could have been worse. It turned out to be ... say things like "How's my widdle wuvvy-duvvy babykins?" etc) hurts.

Hope things turn out OK

Thank you, Harvey.
but is it overly insensitive to insert an ObAUE?

Not at all.
I've not thought a great deal about this, but suspect I'd have assumed that doubling-up and rhyming baby talk is ... didn't talk about having an "eggy-weggy" for breakfast, no kid in his right mind would ever think of doing so.

I think the doubling-up is perfectly reasonable and probably is normal for toddlers. It seems to serve as one of those valuable redundancies in language. I don't know about baby talk in other languages, though.
Perhaps not, though: given your dislike of baby-waby forms coupled with your son's use of them, perhaps it's hard-wired into human speech for infant learners to use double and rhyming forms.[/nq]My son doesn't use the rhyming forms, only the Chinese doubling forms, which is what he learned here. I also use the doubling forms, but mostly as a joke in my English classes, eg, when I want to say "***" without using that English word or "***" or some other technical term, or "poop", I just say "sai-sai" (rhymes with "bye- bye") and my students understand and laugh. That's the term they all learned when they were still in diapers.

But it's the use of that single word for "leg" ("jiao"), whether single or doubled-up, that drives me really crazy. It's a term that means everything from the hip joint to the tips of one's toes. If my ankle or my knee hurts, I use the specific location in English, but Chinese speakers here in Taiwan will almost always say "jiao".
There's undoubtedly a PhD on this somewhere..

I'm sure there is. It would be interesting to read a good one.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
"My wife just hit someobdy with the car and broke his ankle, so I've got to go to the hospital with them. She's a bit hysterical and I should drive."

Gosh, I'm really sorry to hear that. Fingers crossed for everyone involved.

Dena Jo
Email goes to denajo2 at the dot com variation of the Yahoo domain. Have I confused you? Go here:
http://myweb.cableone.net/denajo/emailme.htm
Harvey Van Sickle wrote on 07 Aug 2004:

I'll echo the others in their best wishes. I actually think she was quite fortunate- the potential for serious or fatal head injuries is always there, and I imagine few motorcycle riders there* are wearing helmets, especially in the summer.

Like "pooh-pooh", I suppose.
But it's the use of that single word for "leg" ("jiao"), whether single or doubled-up, that drives me really crazy. ... knee hurts, I use the specific location in English, but Chinese speakers here in Taiwan will almost always say "jiao".

There's undoubtedly a PhD on this somewhere..

I'm sure there is. It would be interesting to read a good one.

Do you have any comment on the use of doubled words with the number one stuck between? I asked a teacher about that some years ago, but she didn't appear to have been much aware of it formally, and reacted like any native speaker of English would when asked about a pattern- by dredging out example after example from memory.

* I initially wrote "Taiwanese", but that word doesn't seem quite right. "Taiwan" is probably better. Is there an even better term?

Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward" (Email Removed) Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Spehro Pefhany wrote on 07 Aug 2004:
Harvey Van Sickle wrote on 07 Aug 2004:

I'll echo the others in their best wishes.

Thank you, Spehro.
I actually think she was quite fortunate-

I agree with you. Both she and the boy were fortunate that he wasn't more seriously injured. We went to the hosptial this after and discovered that he's still waiting for surgery. It turned out that his doctor was also the doctor responsible for someone else who had been brought to the ER last night, a neighbor of the boy and his father who'd been seriously hurt in an auto accident a couple hours later.
the potential for serious or fatal head injuries is always there, and I imagine few motorcycle riders there* are wearing helmets, especially in the summer.

I don't know about the riders in Taipei, Taijong, or Kaohsiung, but out in the country where I live, few riders wear a helmet, buckle up the chin strap when they do wear one, or wear either goggles or a plastic visor (I can't remember what it's called now, but it is a windshield to protect the helmet rider's face from rocks, bugs, and dirt, and his eyes from the wind.
I think the doubling-up is perfectly reasonable and probably is ... term they all learned when they were still in diapers.

Like "pooh-pooh", I suppose.

Right. In Chinese, most words have two characters and two sounds. The full word is "ban-sai" (Pretty close to the Japanese "ban-zai" = "may you live 10,000 years", a salute to the Japanese emperor; I don't know the tones and am too lazy to look them up)
Do you have any comment on the use of doubled words with the number one stuck between?

I've never heard it. I'll have to ask my wife. I'll get back to you on that
I asked a teacher about that some years ago, but she didn't appear to have been much aware of it ... initially wrote "Taiwanese", but that word doesn't seem quite right. "Taiwan" is probably better. Is there an even better term?

For those of us who are residents here, the best term is probably "Taiwaner(s)". I thought I had invented it 8 years ago, but it was actually invented by others long before I ever thought of it. I reinvented it, though.
Not all ROC citizens consider themselves Taiwanese many think of themselves as Chinese; not all those who consider themselves Taiwanese are considered Taiwanese by the aboriginal tribes here before the first Ming dynasty refugees settled here. And, of course, the Chinese (PRC) think of us as manilanders and force the rest of the world to call us "Chinese Taipei" at all internationally sanctioned sports events. Then, of course, there are us non-Chinese, non-ROC-citizens, and we think of ourselves in other ways.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Show more