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Emotion: cryinghi. I've got a big problem. I am not be able to understand the difference between adverbials

For example these two sentences.why we cant use HOWEVER in first.why we cant use BUT in second sentence???

1-I usually have a certain amount of trouble finding a parking places,BUT this time really took the cake.

2-A year ago I was in a carpool with four other people,HOWEVER I hated having to wait around on because of my carpool members werent ready.

and another question;in this sentence why we use SO instead of THEREFORE???

There were no parking places in campüs,SO I had to park in the downtown mall.
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It has to do with commas and semicolons. But should be preceded by the former, while however should be preceded by the latter. Therefore, your #2 is mistyped or misrepresented; at the moment, but can be used there, but however cannot. The same logic applies to so and therefore, respectively.

I was in a carpool, but I hated waiting around.
I was in a carpool; however, I hated waiting around.
I was in a carpool, so I saved gas money.
I was in a carpool; therefore I saved gas money
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thanks Mister Micawber.sorry I wrote HOWEVER instead of BUT by mistake in the second sentence

I dont always find semicolons as a cue in exampaper.I have to distinguish them with their usage in sentence.I have cloze tests and always run into four of them on the same meaning in each choice.

if we put HOWEVER these two sentences and put THEREFORE in another will it wrong?I cant stiil see the difference in meaning
Then your tests are to blame; the punctuation is critical.

I was in a carpool, but I hated waiting around.
I was in a carpool; however, I hated waiting around.
-- these two have essentially the same meaning; the two ideas should merely be considered in a more individual fashion.

I was in a carpool, so I saved gas money.
I was in a carpool; therefore I saved gas money
.-- these two have essentially the same meaning; the two ideas should merely be considered in a more separate fashion.

1-- Use a comma + a little conjunction (and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so) to connect two independent clauses

2-- Use a semicolon to separate clauses with conjunctive adverbs.
Conjunctive adverbs (or sentence adverbs) indicate a connection between 2 independent clauses in one sentence. English has many conjunctive adverbs, including: also, however, otherwise, consequently, indeed, similarly, finally, likewise, then, furthermore, moreover, therefore, hence, nevertheless, thus, nonetheless.
thank you again.You are really very kind.its nice to see somebody who give me a helping hand[A]
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