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Yes. In fact, that's the only thing it implies; "geezer" is exactly a contemptuous term for 'old man'. -Aaron J. Dinkin Dr. Whom

It also seems to refer to one who exhibits odd behavior probably the older of the meanings (from guiser, a masquerader). So the common term "old geezer" is becoming a tautology. http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=geezer Best regards, Spehro Pefhany

One thing really bores me stupid on here, it's people quoting huge chunks of the OED. So here's my turn:-
"Geezer A term of derision applied esp. to men, usu. but not necessarily elderly; a chap, fellow.
1885 ‘CORIN’ Truth about Stage 16 If we wake up the old geezers we shallget notice to quit without compensation..The two geezers, as Sandy styled the landlord and his wife. 1893 Northumbld. Gloss., Geezer, a mummer; and hence any grotesque or queer character. 1897 Westm. Gaz. 17 Aug. 2/3 So an obliging firm of Liverpool solicitors, like the nice old geeser in the song, have just assured him. 1904 ‘NO. 1500’ Life in Sing Sing 248/2 Geezer, a fellow. 1910 Punch 5 Oct. 243 'Old yer blooming rah, an' give the old geyser (sc. a lady singer) a charnst, cawn't yer? 1914 Dialect Notes IV. 201 The old geezer wouldn't let us play ball in his pasture.
1938 G. GREENE Brighton Rock II. i. 74 You're a grand little geezer. Ibid.II. ii. 90 A geezer can't have an alibi for every minute of the day. Ibid. IV. ii. 267 I'll tell you a thing or two, you bloody little geezer. 1958 (see BARON 2c). 1958 J. SYMONS Gigantic Shadow vii. 37 There's a geezer I know named Twisty Dodds, kind of a small-time crook you might call him.
1960 (see BIRD n. 1d). 1965 (see CHINA1 7)."

To save you hacking through that lot, it sounds as if (as so often) US usage relects earlier BrE usage, and BrE starts to change towards the non-age specific usage in the 1930.
DC, aspiring geezer
Do Brit Geezers always have a two-day growth of grey beard stubble?

Not at all, that sounds more like dossers. In fact there's the popular 'a tasty geezer' which at goes back ... watch, maybe a bit dangerous (it may have started in boxing) as in 'he's a bit tasty that Wayne Rooney'.

And when this has come up previously I've murmured that Plum Wodehouse had Bertie Wooster describe Miss Roberta Wickham as a "young geezer".

Incidentally, I see that Michael Quinion's mailing this weekend suggests that "bloke" (Hi, Linz!) may have originated Underpondially, or even possible Leftpondially.
Matti
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I was afraid of that. In BrE 'geezer' is especially thought of as being East London slang. In this august ... do often say 'an old geezer' but there's nothing contradictory about saying something like 'some young geezer gone nicked it'.

I think 'geezer' in BrE is generally a neutral term - there is commonly a qualifying adjective which determines what is being said about the person in question. So you can have an old geezer and a young geezer, and you can have a diamond geezer (such as the staunch Ray Winstone). OED cites include "nice old geeser" and "grand little geezer" as well as "bloody little geezer".
'Geezer' on its own has, perhaps, become a term for the type who takes a pride in living off his wits. "A little bit 'Woo' a little bit 'Wey'."
John Dean
Oxford
I think 'geezer' in BrE is generally a neutral term - there is commonly a qualifying adjective which determines what ... for the type who takes a pride in living off his wits. "A little bit 'Woo' a little bit 'Wey'."

It's almost synonymous with that old AUE favourite "bloke".

Speaking of which, USAians sometimes misuse "bloke", when trying to "speak" BrE. It's OK to say: "Any of you blokes fancy a pint?", but NOT: "Come on, blokes, let's have some pints". Same with "geezer".

The "come on, let's " usage only seems to work with "lads", "chaps" or (increasingly frequently nowadays) "guys".

Mike M
I was afraid of that. In BrE 'geezer' is especially ... about saying something like 'some young geezer gone nicked it'.

I think 'geezer' in BrE is generally a neutral term - there is commonly a qualifying adjective which determines what ... for the type who takes a pride in living off his wits. "A little bit 'Woo' a little bit 'Wey'."

'No, I'll nick it, I mean it'. It may be time for Fast Show FAQs...

DC, who this week has been mostly eating...
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One of my mates comes from Romford on the fringes of London, takes his East Endership very seriously,

Did he move from Romford to the East End, or the other way around? If he thinks Romford is in the East End, he's mistaken! Not even Ilford's in the East End.
One of my mates comes from Romford on the fringes of London, takes his East Endership very seriously,

Did he move from Romford to the East End, or the other way around? If he thinks Romford is in the East End, he's mistaken! Not even Ilford's in the East End.

I'm sure you know as well as I do that the East End stops at the end of Southend pier, and has mainly moved out of London to places like Romford.

DC
Did he move from Romford to the East End, or ... End, he's mistaken! Not even Ilford's in the East End.

I'm sure you know as well as I do that the East End stops at the end of Southend pier,

Yes, I do know that Southend became known to Victorians as "Whitechapel-on-Sea" because of the hordes of Eastenders who went there. ;-) But that's not the point.
How far north do you think it's spread? Basildon? Billericay? Chelmsford?
and has mainly moved out of London to places like Romford.

I'm sure you know as well as I do that Romford's part of London, as you yourself implied in your previous posting. Just not part of the East End.
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BTW and OT, in BrE a 'geezer' just means 'a good guy' - does it imply age in AmE?

Yes.
Gary Williams
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