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(somebody said)

Very true.

Oh, you guys. You had a Queen Victoria, you had a Queen Alexandra. Surely Diana fits right in that category of name. Classical. Ending in -a.

Boudicca, Matilda, Camilla ...

John Dean
Oxford
(somebody said) Oh, you guys. You had a Queen Victoria, ... right in that category of name. Classical. Ending in -a.

Boudicca, Matilda, Camilla ...

When and why did Boadicea become Boudicca? I find this rewriting of historical names most irritating.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
When and why did Boadicea become Boudicca? I find this rewriting of historical names most irritating.

"Boadicea" is what the Romans called her. "Boudicca" is thought by scholars to be closer to what she called herself.
Fran
When and why did Boadicea become Boudicca? I find this rewriting of historical names most irritating.

"Boadicea" is what the Romans called her. "Boudicca" is thought by scholars to be closer to what she called herself.

Well, she's not in a position to mind what we call her and I prefer consistency. Boadicea is a mighty sort of name, with its surprising multisyllables. Boudicca sounds like a description of a flasher.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
"Boadicea" is what the Romans called her. "Boudicca" is thought by scholars to be closer to what she called herself.

Well, she's not in a position to mind what we call her and I prefer consistency. Boadicea is a mighty sort of name, with its surprising multisyllables. Boudicca sounds like a description of a flasher.

That's because you're pronouncing it as it's spelled, rather than how scholars think she would have pronounced it, which has the 'cc' pronounced as a 'g'.
Are you with me so far?
Fran
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
"Boadicea" is what the Romans called her. "Boudicca" is thought by scholars to be closer to what she called herself.

Well, she's not in a position to mind what we call her and I prefer consistency. Boadicea is a mighty sort of name, with its surprising multisyllables. Boudicca sounds like a description of a flasher.

My favourite of these changes was the one that replaced "Canute" with "Cnut" it looks like it's advertising a competitor to French Connection.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
Well, she's not in a position to mind what we ... surprising multisyllables. Boudicca sounds like a description of a flasher.

That's because you're pronouncing it as it's spelled, rather than how scholars think she would have pronounced it, which has the 'cc' pronounced as a 'g'. Are you with me so far?

Er, yes, I think so. Boo-digger, then? Ambushed by a spade? I still prefer the Roman way.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
That's because you're pronouncing it as it's spelled, rather than ... pronounced as a 'g'. Are you with me so far?

Er, yes, I think so. Boo-digger, then? Ambushed by a spade? I still prefer the Roman way.

No; Boo-deeger, like bodega, only not.
Fran
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Er, yes, I think so. Boo-digger, then? Ambushed by a spade? I still prefer the Roman way.

No; Boo-deeger, like bodega, only not.

No, not at all: bodega is surely bod-ayger.
Now I have this overwhelming urge to get it absolutely right, in case I run into one of these scholars, so which syllable is emphasised - the boo or the deeger?

Laura, who calls herself Law-ra
(emulate St. George for email)
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