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Swimming's fun, untill you have to leave the pool.
including new films and TV series based on the original comic book series


Is the apostrophe wrong here ? Swimming's.

And series as I understand it depends on its context and doesn't take the apostrophe. Series here means multiple but series does not change to mean just one also. Any other examples of words like this where the apostrophe is concerned ?


Contemptous and deadly. But could the situation get worse.
Entertainment is not a copywriter’s bread and butter. Getting work is.


Is this exceptable usage with the fragments separated with a period. 'Getting work is'' needs just a comma, right.

These were from a newspaper and english site.

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"Swimming's" is a contraction of "swimming is". Contractions use apostrophes to show where the missing letters were.

I don't see how "series" and apostrophes go together here.

panda blue 483Is this acceptable usage with the fragments separated by a period? 'Getting work is'' needs just a comma, right?

In fiction writing, the rules are a lot more flexible. "Contemptous and deadly. But could the situation get worse?" is good if that's how you want it. Only the first part is a fragment, by the way.

The second one is fine the way you have it. Both parts are sentences, the second with the understood predicate nominative "a copywriter’s bread and butter". There is a school (with me in it) that accepts a comma between contrasting clauses, "Entertainment is not a copywriter’s bread and butter, getting work is.", but the emphasis changes. With the period, you stress "is". With the comma, you stress "work". But so many people will cry foul about that comma that it is safer to start a new sentence.