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1) Antisemitism in Ukraine has been a historical issue in the country but became even more widespread in the twentieth century.

2) I have used up most of the supplies in the freezer, and am carefully rationing the remaining items to prolong my life.


So, in these examples the subject Antisemitism is elided and I on the second example so as to take a comma.

But as a rule, does the information after the comma have to have reference to an elided subject to take a comma.


E.g. and (I am) carefully rationing the remaining items.


This is just a phrase without I am as written. In other words, is it just the reference 'am' that suggests something has been elided or can you stick the comma in either way on the basis a subject has been referenced in the first sentence?

I have used up most of the supplies in the freezer, and carefully rationing the remaining items.


I understand a comma can go there at the writer’s discretion but it's not always clear if a subject has been elided or you're just reading a dependent clause, which would mean no comma generally.

Word corrects the second example and removes the comma, but it's joining an independent sentence with an elided subject, even though it is dependent as written. (So as strict rule it should take a comma)

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panda blue 4831) Antisemitism in Ukraine [has been a historical issue in the country but became even more widespread in the twentieth century].

Simple sentence. Compound predicate. No comma.

panda blue 4832) I [have used up most of the supplies in the freezer and am carefully rationing the remaining items to prolong my life].

Simple sentence. Compound predicate. No comma.

panda blue 483I have used up most of the supplies in the freezer, and carefully rationing the remaining items.

Ungrammatical.

It contains a coordinating conjunction (and) that introduces a non-finite clause (participle clause).

CJ