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Hi friends:

I saw a sentence as below --
"The Online Privacy Protection Act, effective July 1, 2000, applies to the online collection of personal information from people under 18."

I'm confused by the usage of the word effective; it looks like a preposition is missing!
Am i right??

And I consider that the correct usage should be either "effective from July 1, 2000" or "effective on July 1, 2000".

Please advise, thank you!
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0915regI'm confused by the usage of the word effective; it looks like a preposition is missing!
A date without a preposition before it is very common after effective in this context. It represents a sort of legalistic style.

CJ
Comments  
Hi.
0915regAnd I consider that the correct usage should be "effective from July 1, 2000"
So do I. No, "On" doesn't sound good because the law is valid from July 1.
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Hi, Fandorin:

Do you think if it's possible that "effective July 1, 2000" is an omission?

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Yes, I do. But as Jim explained it's possible. Since I'm not accustomed to legal texts I go along with Jim.
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It means the law was implemented on July 1, 2000. It's basically a shortening of which came into effect on July 1, 2000 or which will come into effect on July 1, 2000.

"Achievement came to be effective" Is it correct group of words ,may be put in a full sentence?

"Achievement came to be effective" Is it correct group of words ,may be put in a full sentence?

Yes, would you like to try?

Clive

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