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He called the Fun Zone, asking to meet the guys from the video.

Hi, I saw that sentence in a tv-series. I suppose I can rewrite it as: 1- "He called the Fun Zone and asked to meet the guys from the video."

What I am wondering is the function of the participle, asking, in that sentence? I think it conveys the purpose of the call. But these actions are happening in order: First he calls and then asks to meet. I feel like using "asking" like that breaks this order and implies as if these two actions are happening at the same time.

As far as I know participles can be used to give more information about condition, result, reason or time not purpose.

For example this sentence below seems awkward to me:

2- He went to the library, studying for the exam. (To me, it means that he went to the library while studying for the exam or in the process of going to the library, he studied for the exam. Probably He studied for the exam on his way to the library.)

3- He went to the library and studied for the exam. (But this one sounds okay.)

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mango pen 189He called the Fun Zone, asking to meet the guys from the video.
Hi, I saw that sentence in a tv-series. TV series. I suppose I can rewrite it as: 1- "He called the Fun Zone and asked to meet the guys from the video."

Yes and no. It's not exactly the same sentence, but close.

mango pen 189What I am wondering is the function of the participle, asking, in that sentence? I think it conveys the purpose of the call.

That's a possibility. Yes.

mango pen 189But these actions are happening in order: First he calls and then asks to meet.

In your "and" version, yes.

mango pen 189 I feel like using "asking" like that breaks this order and implies as if these two actions are happening at the same time.

Yes, in a way. "The call" is not the motion of the fingers needed to contact the other person. "The call" is the whole conversation that took place over the phone, which included the asking. The asking was essence of the call. You might even say that the asking was the call. In that interpretation, it can't be that the call happened first and then the asking.

mango pen 189As far as I know participles can be used to give more information about condition, result, reason or time not purpose.

You take what you read in grammar books much too literally. Isn't purpose like reason?

mango pen 189For example this sentence below seems awkward to me: 2- He went to the library, studying for the exam.

Yes, it's pretty strange.

mango pen 1893- He went to the library and studied for the exam. (But this one sounds okay.)

True.

CJ

Comments  
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Thank you. I think that the first version, using "asking", implies"call" is the main action and "asking" is the secondary action that happens throughout the first action ?

mango pen 189I think that the first version, using "asking", implies"call" is the main action and "asking" is the secondary action that happens throughout the first action?

You say "I think" and say what you think, but then put a question mark at the end. Are you asking me if you really think that? Because I don't know. I can only suppose so. Emotion: smile

Anyway, your interpretation seems valid to me.

CJ

Thanks. What does this sentence mean to you? "He went to the library, studying for the exam."

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mango pen 189

Thanks. What does this sentence mean to you? "He went to the library, studying for the exam."

I find it mostly incomprehensible. I don't think anybody would write such a sentence.

It paints a picture of somebody walking to a library with an open book in his hands. He's reading it and trying to learn the contents as he walks. Does anything like that ever really happen?

CJ

Thanks. One speaker said to me that : "As with "call", so "go" can refer to the entire duration of the visit ("I went to Rome for two weeks" does not mean it took me two weeks to get there). Therefore it is possible that he did study for the exam in the library," That makes sense to me. I wanted to share with you.


But there is another possibility as you suggested it. Maybe the subject studied on the way: Imagine that when I want to go to library, I take a bus and it takes 1 hour to get me there. So I study during this one hour in the bus.

mango pen 189

Thanks. One speaker said to me that : "As with "call", so "go" can refer to the entire duration of the visit ("I went to Rome for two weeks" does not mean it took me two weeks to get there). Therefore it is possible that he did study for the exam in the library," That makes sense to me. I wanted to share with you.


But there is another possibility as you suggested it. Maybe the subject studied on the way: Imagine that when I want to go to library, I take a bus and it takes 1 hour to get me there. So I study during this one hour in the bus.

What you have here in your post is evidence that, given almost any sentence, we can invent any number of scenarios which give it a reasonable meaning.

This means that sometimes — more often than we realize — a sentence can have more than one meaning. However, by providing more context, we can "guide" the meaning of the sentence in one direction or another. Emotion: smile

CJ

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