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1) You have to make important decisions; these can be about university and personal relationships.
2) You have to make important decisions: these can be about university and personal relationships.

Although I have seen the #1 sentence in my textbook, I think that the #2 sentence is better or correct like

He has made his decision: The criminal has to be innocent.

But come to think of it, the example sentence has a little bit of difference from the #2 sentence. Well, so which sentence and which punctuation is better or correct, you think?

Thank you.
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Comments  
Anonymous1) You have to make important decisions; these can be about university and personal relationships.2) You have to make important decisions: these can be about university and personal relationships.Although I have seen the #1 sentence in my textbook, I think that the #2 sentence is better or correct likeHe has made his decision: The criminal has to be innocent. But come to think of it, the example sentence has a little bit of difference from the #2 sentence. Well, so which sentence and which punctuation is better or correct, you think?Thank you.
"... so which sentence and which punctuation is better or correct, you think?"

Both are correct and can be used interchangeably here. The usage of the punctuation often depends on the author's style in a piece of writing.
AnonymousAlthough I have seen the #1 sentence in my textbook, I think that the #2 sentence is better or correct
They are both correctly punctuated. I rather prefer the first one, actually.
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Hi

I am going to respectfully disagree. The colon is good if it introduces examples of what you have said in the first part of the sentence, or if it clarifies or defines further the first part:

- You can use your own choice of vegetables: I like carrots, courgettes and peas

- You have to make important decisions: these can be about university and personal relationships

- The decision had been made: he was innocent

In UK punctuation, I'd say, the semi-colon creates a pause that is longer than with a comma; but the colon introduces the idea of consequence or explanation or a list of examples

Dave
dave_anonI am going to respectfully disagree
You're not disagreeing with me: the sentence can be taken either way.
Hi

OK. You said 1) and I said 2), which might signal some kind of disagreement; but I'm happy if it's not so (in the UK we are very sensitive to causing disagreement!)

Dave
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dave_anonOK. You said 1) and I said 2)
No, I am saying that the second clause can be taken either way: as a clause continuing the point being made or as an example/explanation. I prefer the first. Why would you disagree?
I am sorry to interrupt, but if I choose either colon or semi-colon, each sentence has the meaning or not?
Hi

Well, because deciding which university to go to and how to deal with personal relationships are examples of the decisions referred to in the first part of the sentence. So, for me, the colon works - but I agree that either can be used

Dave
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