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Hello, teachers. How are you? I have a question about usage of 'since' and 'after'. I know that 'since' and 'after' have different usage in different sentences but sometimes I feel like both are interchangeable.

For example,

Yesterday was the hottest day since I came here.

Yesterday was the hottest day after I came here.

I think either one is fine or is there a difference in meaning and usage? Thank you so much as usual and I really hope to hear from you.
Comments  
They are not interchangeable there. "Since" includes all the seconds from then until now. "After" drops you on one spot in that time.
Since -a point in past time: 'Since my arrival, yesterday has been the hottest day yet (but who knows what tomorrow will bring because my time here isn't finished).' Hence, the perfect tense. But, 'After all the days (which have come and gone since) I have been here, yesterday was the hottest.' Simple past because this time period has finished. Thanks
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Kwang Hee HanYesterday was the hottest day since I came here. Yesterday was the hottest day after I came here.
Both "since" and "after" can be used as conjunctions and for me their meanings are identical in your examples.

CB
enoonThey are not interchangeable there. "Since" includes all the seconds from then until now. "After" drops you on one spot in that time.
Now I have understood your explanation!! Thank you and "Yesterday was the hottest since I came here" is correct in grammar. Am I right? Since I have found it in a dictionary, I think the pattern is being used by native English speakers. Am I right?
Yesterday was the hottest day since I came here.
Yesterday was the hottest day after I came here.

If the second sentence is meant to mean the same as the first, it is unidiomatic. "After" is impossible in that setting; that's what we have "since" for.
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Cool BreezeBoth "since" and "after" can be used as conjunctions and for me their meanings are identical in your examples.
I see your point. Actually, from a logical point of view, it is right. However, it is unidiomatic, as has been already said.

If these both conjunctions were interchangeable, people would be using both, but as far as I know, I have seen only sinceplenty of times in such usage.Emotion: wink
I am a college English professor, and your second example is incorrect. Here is the rule: When using a perfect form of a verb to indicate an action continuing into the future, use "since." When using the past tense of a verb to indicate action happening at a point in the past, but not necessarily continuing, use "after." Good luck!