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Hi,
Here is an article from BBC:

"A suicide bomb blast in the centre of Istanbul has injured 22 people, including 10 policemen. Police say the bomber tried to board a police bus in Taksim Square. Twelve civilians were also hurt."

I understand the usage of the present perfect in the first sentence,I am just asking why they did not use this tense in the last sentence. Could we replace it with the present perfect? Because I would say : "...have also been hurt."

Thank you in advance.
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Hi,

Here is an article from BBC:

"A suicide bomb blast in the centre of Istanbul has injured 22 people, including 10 policemen. Police say the bomber tried to board a police bus in Taksim Square. Twelve civilians were also hurt."

I understand the usage of the present perfect in the first sentence,I am just asking why they did not use this tense in the last sentence. Could we replace it with the present perfect? Because I would say : "...have also been hurt."

Yes, you could do that. You could also say '. . . has tried to board . . '.

But the way the article is written is very normal, very idiomatic. We don't tend to write lots of repetitions of Present Perfect.

Think of it like this. The first Present Perfect makes us think of 'some point of time in the past'. It's like a camera in our brain is switched to focus on the past. Now we just use Simple Past.

eg I have passed my Math exam. I answered 9 questions correctly. I only made one mistake.

But not

eg I have passed my Math exam. I have answered 9 questions correctly. I have only made one mistake.

Clive
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you a lot,you have been really helpful.Emotion: wink
So..,it is OK to use the present perfect in the headline and then it is suitable to use the simple past,right? I suppose that the continuous usage of the present perfect is not wrong,but rather awkward...
Hi,

So..,it is OK to use the present perfect in the headline and then it is suitable to use the simple past,right? I suppose so. Much depends on the context, on the specific example.

I suppose that the continuous usage of the present perfect is not wrong,but rather awkward...

It's certainly less common.

Clive