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I've been a passive visitor to this forum for quite some time now. I must say I've learnt a lot visiting this forum and I thank everyone who've made this happen. Here's a question (my first question!Emotion: smile) on whether 'that' can be used in the following:

I'm going out to meet someone who I know.
I'm going out to meet someone that I know.
I'm going out to meet someone I know.

make sure you get it done by eob today.
make sure that you get it done by eob today.

Could someone please tell me which among the above are valid constructs. Thanks in advance!
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ezfred0131whether 'that' can be used in the following
Yes. that can be used. (Or omitted.) It's not a problem either way.
CJ
Comments  
"I'm going out to meet someone I know." and "Make sure you get it done by end of business today." are best. But "Make sure that you get it done by end of business today." is fine.
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"Make sure you get it done by end of business today."

Sir, I want to know when 'that' can be used in these type of sentences.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Use "who" for people, "that" for things. In the sentence you posted, a strict grammarian would choose "None of the above." The correct sentence is "I'm going out to meet someone whom I know."

Besides plunging you into the who/whom problem, that sentence forces you to sound unnatural. Very few people use whom in ordinary speech.

So I would opt for "I'm going out to meet someone I know."

Your second question is equally sticky. Generally speaking, "make sure that" is more formal than "make sure." If you're writing for publication, use that just to be on the safe side. But if you're writing dialogue, you probably will want to omit that in the sentence you posted.

If you're really a stickler, you might want to get your hands on The Associated Press Handbook and read their entry for that. It gives all kinds of guidelines (more than I can keep track of) about inserting that into sentences like yours. The Handbook also has a comforting rule of thumb: When in doubt, use that.
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