+0

I found the following sentence from a bbc article that I've read recently. The thing that I cannot understand is why they have used past participle tense, though they know the time of that event. I mean, it states that he said it just some hours earlier. Therefore, it is evident that the speaker knows the time that the event happened.


Just hours earlier, Pyongyang had said denuclearisation talks with Washington could finally resume later this week.


Reference :

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-49902182

+1

I found the following sentence from a bbc in a BBC article that I've read recently. The thing that I cannot understand is why they have used the past perfect participle tense, though they know the time of that event. I mean, it states that he said it just some hours earlier. Therefore, it is evident that the speaker knows the time that the event happened.

Just hours earlier, Pyongyang had said denuclearisation talks with Washington could finally resume later this week.”

----------------------------------------

The past perfect can be used when we are talking about a past event that happened before another past event.

In the above example, we have:

1- Pyongyang [ North Korea] had said …

2- North Korea (may have) fired a ballistic missile …

Because #1 happened before #2, we can use the past perfect for #1.

+1
dileepapast participle tense,

That is not the correct terminology.

Past perfect is the name.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
+1
dileepathough they know the time of that event.

Knowing the time does not affect usage of the past perfect. Past perfect is used to make a clear sequence of two events in the past.


South Korean officials said a missile launched (Event #1) near the port of Wonsan flew about 450km (280 miles) and reached an altitude of 910km, before landing in the Sea of Japan.


Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said (Event #2) it was a violation of United Nations Security Council resolutions which ban North Korea from the use of ballistic missile technology.

Just hours earlier, Pyongyang had said (Event #3) denuclearisation talks with Washington could finally resume later this week.


The past perfect tense situates Event 3 as happening shortly before Event #2. Because of the short time period (hours), we assume that event #3 came after event #1. The sequence of events are:

1. The missile launch.
2. Denuclearization talks announcement.
3. Japanese PM announcement.

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Thank you very much for the answer.

Thank you very much for the answer.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

Thank you for the answer. I really appreciate it.