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Hi. Do you agree with what I said here with examples?

eg,

He met people who came to the meeting yesterday. - I think this means he met some people who came to the meeting yesterday but not all who came to the meeting that day. I think the sentence doesn't say he met all the people who came to the meeting.

He met the people who came to the meeting yesterday. - I think this means that he met all the people who came to the meeting yesterday.
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Hi,

You're right.

Clive
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Hi. Thank you. How do you see the difference here?

The enemies were (the?) people who had been moved to the northern area when the battle began.
Hi,

How do you see the difference here?

The enemies were people who had been moved to the northern area when the battle began. Not necessarily all such people.

The enemies were the people who had been moved to the northern area when the battle began. All of them. Sounds like the writer probably thinks the reader already knows something about these people.

Clive
Hi. Thank you, again.

Does your comment (response) indicate that the sentence could be seen as referencing all the people, that is all the people who had been moved to the northern area when the battle began? I don't think my sentence in my first post could be seen as referencing all the people who came to the meeting. My sentence in my first post was "He met people who came to the meeting yesterday."

Your sentence in your response:

The enemies were people who had been moved to the northern area when the battle began. Not necessarily all such people
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Hi again,

Does your comment (response) indicate that the sentence could be seen as referencing all the people, that is all the people who had been moved to the northern area when the battle began? I don't think my sentence in my first post could be seen as referencing all the people who came to the meeting. In your first post, you said 'I think the sentence doesn't say he met all the people who came to the meeting', and I said that you were right.

Neither sentence would normally be taken to mean 'all the people', but it's not totally impossible that that is the intended meaning. Most native speakers wouldn't usually express it like that.

My sentence in my first post was "He met people who came to the meeting yesterday."

Your sentence in your response:

The enemies were people who had been moved to the northern area when the battle began. Not necessarily all such people

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you for your help.