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I read this in another thread:-
Use either "than me" or "than I am." Purists may tell you that the latter is the correct choice, but you'll certainly hear the former.
So in these sentences which is correct an why? He is taller than me, or he is taller than I am.
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AnonymousI read this in another thread:-
Use either "than me" or "than I am." Purists may tell you that the latter is the correct choice, but you'll certainly hear the former.
So in these sentences which is correct and why? He is taller than me, or he is taller than I am.
If you use a personal pronoun on its own after than, it must be an object pronoun such as 'me' or 'him.' It used to be considered correct to use a subject pronoun such as 'I' or 'he', but this now sounds very old-fashoined.

My brother is younger than me.
Lamin is shorter than her.

However, if the pronoun is the subject of a clause, you use a subject pronoun.

They knew my past much better than she did.
He's taller than I am.

(Collins Cobuild English Usage)

I hope this helps.
Yoong LiatIf you use a personal pronoun on its own after than, it must be an object pronoun such as 'me' or 'him.' It used to considered correct to use a subject pronoun such as 'I' or 'he', but this now sounds very old-fashoined.

Actually, a professor of mine (he teaches Transports, not English, but he's a typical British gentleman!) speaks this way, and I'm so used to it that I've picked it up. Rather than 'old-fashioned,' I'd say it's quite formal, but in some contexts I guess it might be the best choice.

[url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/webcast/070322_ih/language.shtml ] Here's [/url] what the BBC Learning English say:

My brother is taller than me.
This sentence sounds very natural but again it is not strictly grammatically correct. The 'correct' form is 'My brother is taller than I'. This is because this sentence is actually a shortened form of 'My brother is taller than I am'. Using the correct form can sound very formal and might not be suitable depending on to whom you were talking (or would you say 'who you were talking to'?)


Ah, and finally ... "It used to considered correct to use a subject pronoun" ==> "It was considered correct", you meant? or "It was used to being ..."?
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Tanit
Yoong LiatIf you use a personal pronoun on its own after than, it must be an object pronoun such as 'me' or 'him.' It used to considered correct to use a subject pronoun such as 'I' or 'he', but this now sounds very old-fashoined.
Actually, a professor of mine (he teaches Transports, not English, but he's a typical British gentleman!) speaks this way, and I'm so used to it that I've picked it up. Rather than 'old-fashioned,' I'd say it's quite formal, but in some contexts I guess it might be the best choice.

[url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/webcast/070322_ih/language.shtml ] Here's [/url] what the BBC Learning English say:

My brother is taller than me.
This sentence sounds very natural but again it is not strictly grammatically correct. The 'correct' form is 'My brother is taller than I'. This is because this sentence is actually a shortened form of 'My brother is taller than I am'. Using the correct form can sound very formal and might not be suitable depending on to whom you were talking (or would you say 'who you were talking to'?)


Ah, and finally ... "It used to considered correct to use a subject pronoun" ==> "It was considered correct", you meant? or "It was used to being ..."?
Thanks for pointing out the error. It should be "It used to be considered correct to use a subject pronoun such as 'I' or 'he', but this now sounds very old-fashoined."

What I've stated is quoted from Collins Cobuild English Usage.
Yoong LiatWhat I've stated is quoted from Collins Cobuild English Usage.

Yes, I know, but ... different sources, different opinions. Nothing seems black and white in English! Emotion: smile
Tanit
Yoong LiatWhat I've stated is quoted from Collins Cobuild English Usage.

Yes, I know, but ... different sources, different opinions. Nothing seems black and white in English! Emotion: smile
I agree. That shows English experts sometimes differ.
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TanitThe 'correct' form is 'My brother is taller than I'
That might be OK in Latin but not modern English. Only use a subject pronoun when a verb is present (not implied).
TanitRather than 'old-fashioned,' I'd say it's quite formal, but in some contexts I guess it might be the best choice.
This is not a matter of formality or fashion; using the object pronoun is often ambiguous or opened ended and needs to be used with care. Take the following sentence for example:
"You like him more than me." Does that mean "You like him more than I do." or does it mean "You like him more than you like me."?
Bokeh
TanitThe 'correct' form is 'My brother is taller than I'
That might be OK in Latin but not modern English. Only use a subject pronoun when a verb is present (not implied).
Hi,

Please re-read my post. The part in blue is not mine, but from the BBC website.
Bokeh
This is not a matter of formality or fashion; using the object pronoun is often ambiguous or opened ended and needs to be used with care. Take the following sentence for example:
"You like him more than me." Does that mean "You like him more than I do." or does it mean "You like him more than you like me."?

I agree that your example is ambiguous, but what about "he is taller than I"? I'd say that:
- it is not ambiguous;
- according to the BBC it is correct;
- I hear it sometimes from British native speakers (although they are more likely to say "he is taller than me").

Out of curiosity, what would you say? "he is taller than I am"?
And what would you suggest using, both in casual speech and in formal writing?
Thank you!
TanitThe part in blue is not mine, but from the BBC website.
In my opinion the BBC is a dinosaur. My parents were both educated at very respectable private schools and they too were taught this nonsense. It has never been English, but something that pedantic grammarians who didn't want to waste their Latin studies tried to force on the language. People who use these subject pronoun constructions in place of object pronouns normally are doing so for effect, to show those they are speaking to how clever they are. I have even heard these same people making ridiculous sentences such as "Those interested should see he or I after this presentation.".
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