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Is this a second conditional? I think in second conditional, the tense in the if-clause should be in the past tense and does the modal qualifies as that in the second conditional?

When we could afford, we would get take-out fried chicken.

Can we use the modal both in the if-clause and main clause for these what look to be first conditionals?

When/If you could afford, can you lend me some money?

When/If I have some money, I could lend you some money.
Comments  
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When we could afford it, we would get take-out fried chicken.-- This is fine 2nd conditional.

Can we use the modal both in the if-clause and main clause for these what look to be first conditionals?-- It is sometimes possible if the 'could' is being used as the polite form of 'can', not the past, like this:

When/If you can afford it, could you lend me some money?
When/If I have some money, I could lend you some.
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Hi. How could we know if the modal is serving/acting as the polite version of the modal verb "can" or serving/acting to denote possibility? Does the modal verb "could" in the following sentence, which seems to be a second conditional sentence, denote possibility? I think it does. Thank you for your anticipated help.

If I had this, I could do that.
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Let me answer. The first hint is tense in an if-clause. If it's past, therefore it's impossible and doesn't denote any possibility. If it's present, then it's politer version of "can".
Anonymouswhich seems to be a second conditional sentence
It doesn't seem, it is a second conditional.
Hi. Thank you.
AnonymousIs this a second conditional? I think in second conditional, the tense in the if-clause should be in the past tense and does the modal qualifies qualify as that in the second conditional?

When we could afford, we would get take-out fried chicken.
You speak of "the tense in the if-clause", and yet there is no if-clause.

If we could afford it, we would get fried chicken.
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If we were able to afford it, we would get fried chicken. (Second conditional.)
AnonymousCan we use the modal both in the if-clause and main clause for these what look to be first conditionals?

When/If you could afford, can you lend me some money?

When/If I have some money, I could lend you some money.
*If you could (were able to) afford it, can you lend me some money? [ungrammatical]
*If I have some money, I could (would be able to) lend you some Emotion: money. [ungrammatical]

That's how I see them. Yet,

If you have any problems with the assignment, could you let me know? [could of politeness in a request] ~ If you have ..., please let me know.

CJ
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Hi. Are you saying the following sentence with the modal verb "could" in the main clause, which you corrected denotes the polite form of the modal verb "could"? Thank you for your help in advance.

When/If I have some money, I could lend you some. .