+0

Most grammar books suggest that commas are not normally used to separate the different parts of a compound predicate joined by coordinating conjunctions.

I have been given section and have been asked to identify if the commas that are missing and the commas that may be omitted.

The original section:

But after a few days spent almost entirely out of doors, she wakened one morning knowing what it was to be hungry, and when she sat down to her breakfast she did not glance disdainfully at her porridge and push it away, but took up her spoon and began to eat it and went on eating it until her bowl was empty.

The revised section:

But after a few days spent almost entirely out of doors, she wakened one morning knowing what it was to be hungry, and when she sat down to her breakfast, (comma inserted) she did not glance disdainfully at her porridge and push it away, but took up her spoon and began to eat it and went on eating it until her bowl was empty.

I am having doubts regarding the comma preceding the conjunction "but"(highlighted in bold). Is it to be omitted?

If not, kindly explain.

+0
Here's how I see it.

But after a few days spent almost entirely out of doors, she wakened one morning knowing what it was to be hungry,<<< comma is optional but desirable to improve readability and when she sat down to her breakfast she did not glance disdainfully at her porridge and push it away, <<< comma is optional but desirable to improve readability but took up her spoon and began to eat it and went on eating it until her bowl was empty.

With long sentences, the writer often chooses to insert commas to help the reader to quickly see the structure of the sentence and thus to quickly grasp the meaning.

Clive