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Our starting point tonight: South Korean President Moon Jae-in has received a letter from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson formally inviting him to the G7 Summit this June which will focus on tackling Covid-19, promoting carbon neutrality and free trade.

The top office said in his letter, the UK prime minister thanked President Moon for inviting him to the P4G Summit set to be held in May in Seoul and said the UK will be taking part.


President Moon is expected to send back a response vowing to participate in the G7.


Earlier in the day, the South Korean leader spoke on the phone with Costa Rican President Carlos Alvarado to discuss cooperation on COVID-19 and eco-friendly projects.


Alvarado thanked South Korea for its support in fighting the virus invited Moon to his country and to join a summit of the Central American Integration System set for June.

I was wondering if use of commas in the article is correct or not.

'the G7 Summit this June which will focus on...' Shouldn't there be a comma in front of 'which' to add the information of the G7 Summit?


'the P4G Summit set to be held' Shouldn't there be a comma in front of 'set to be held', too?

I am not sure about 'set for June' Do you think there should be a comma in front of it?


I am trying to use commas correctly but it is not easy. What do you native English speakers think?

Thank you so much as usual.

Comments  
Hans51'the G7 Summit this June which will focus on...' Shouldn't there be a comma in front of 'which' to add the information of the G7 Summit?

It is optional. I would use one.

Hans51'the P4G Summit set to be held' Shouldn't there be a comma in front of 'set to be held', too?

He was invited to one summit, the one in May, so a comma would be slightly misleading.

Hans51 I am not sure about 'set for June' Do you think there should be a comma in front of it?

Same thing. He was invited to that summit and no other.

Hans51I am trying to use commas correctly but it is not easy.

Tell me about it. (I am trying to use commas correctly, but it is not easy.)

Hans51What do you native English speakers think?

The trend of late is toward fewer commas. Always think twice. I think of the comma as a purely mechanical device sadly necessitated by the artificiality of written language. Use only those that are mandatory, as a rule, like the ones in direct address, in dialogue, in lists, and between independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction. There are many more, and many exceptions. I use the Chicago Manual of Style. Journalists use the Associated Press Stylebook. The Brits seem to think they are above all this, but there is the Oxford Guide to Style, if you like.

Thank you so much.

“I would use one.”

Does it mean you would use a comma there, right?