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Hi there,

Is it fine to use 'either' where there are 3 situations.

The remaining seven SMEs were unable to participate either due to their head office being located elsewhere, had not commenced their operation or refused to take part.
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AnonymousThe remaining seven SMEs were unable to participate either due to their head office being located elsewhere, had not commenced their operation or refused to take part.
Hi,
I am terribly sorry, but this sentence makes no sense at all to me!
It looks as if it were an excerpt of an academic work (essay, paper, article) describing the results of some sort of research. Is it?

Are you saying that those SMEs did not take part in something for one or more of the following reasons: (1) location of their head offices, (2) business not started yet, or (3) refusal to participate?
If that's the case, I wouldn't say "were unable to participate", because this does not apply to somebody who "refused to take part" in whatever it may be. If I refuse to do something, I don't want to do it, despite being able to!

As for your question, I wouldn't use "either" and I would also rephrase the part after "due to" ("due to their head office being located elsewhere, had not commenced their operation or refused to take part"), which doesn't sound good to me. I think you've got some problems with verb forms.

Warning: This is just my opinion and I'm not a native, so please wait for some more reliable answers. I really don't want to mislead you.
Comments  
"Either ... or ... or" I follow this construction.
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AnonymousHi there,

Is it fine to use 'either' where there are 3 situations.

The remaining seven SMEs were unable to participate either due to their head office being located elsewhere, had not commenced their operation or refused to take part.

If not how to correct the above sentence

Either John or James or Mary will help you. This pattern is very common, even among good writers of English, and is sometimes disguised by having one or: Either John, James, or Mary wil help you. It is best to avoid both forms.

(Mastering Grammar)

The remaining seven SMEs were unable to participate either due to their head office being located elsewhere, had not commenced their operation or refused to take part.

I would remove the word 'either'.
 Tanit's reply was promoted to an answer.