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Sorry for posting twice.

I'm trying to get my head around the word "especially". Many dictionaries use "especially" when defining other words, but I'm not sure I fully understand the word.I've noticed that some dictionaries have definitions that contradict each other. I think that's why I'm getting confused.

Please read the following sentence:

"Art books are expensive to produce, especially if they contain colour photographs."

Does the sentence mean that art books are expensive to produce even when they don't contain colour photographs?

Or

does it mean that art books are expensive to produce only when they contain colour photographs?

Thank you!
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Comments  
Hi,

Meaning #1.

Clive
Clive, thank you for both of your replies.

I've found another sentence which contains "especially". "Someone or something that is sensual shows or suggests a great liking for physical pleasures, especially sexual pleasures."
a
I take that to mean that someone or something that is sensual shows or suggests a great liking for any physical pleasures, but often they are sexual pleasures. Is that the correct interpretation? My reason for thinking that is that the definition would be "Someone or something that is sensual shows or suggests a great liking for sexual pleasures", if "sensual" relates to sexual pleasures only.

Thank you for giving up your time to help me.
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The adverb "especially" is often used as a kind of intensive, for emphasis only. Thus, it has no real meaning in such uses. The essential meaning of the sentence can be seen by simply eliminating the word "especially." So in this example:

Art books are expensive to produce, especially if they contain color photographs. = Art books are expensive to produce if they contain color photographs.

Other examples:

Of all the girls in school I like her especially. = Of all the girls in school I like her.

I especially like the way she does her hair. = I like the way she does her hair.

And so forth.
Hi,

Yes, that's the correct interpretation.

Clive
Thank you both.

I am still very confused as you both have different interpretations. Don't get me wrong, I appreciate your answers, but I'm still very confused.
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I've just found another example:

Dictionary.com says a veteran is: a person who has served in a military force, especially one who has fought in a war.

The Oxford Dictionary says a veteran is: an ex-member of the armed forces.

The Cambridge Dictionary says a veteran is: someone who has been in the armed forces during a war

I am so confused. I feel very silly, but I have to ask questions else i'll never understand.

Thanks.
Hi,

These examples show that different sources offer somewhat different definitions of the word.
Does that surprise you?

Clive
It does surpise me because the definitions are somewhat different. The Oxford Dictionary says a veteran is: an ex-member of the armed forces, but according to the Cambridge definition you have to have fought in a war to be considered a veteran?.So which definition is correct?

I am still really confused about the word "especially". Most dictionaries use the word to define other words. If I don't understand it, I have no hope of understanding any other words. Thank you.
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