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Hi

The use of having is VERY common in Indian everyday English, even in formal writing. Could you please tell me how you find the following sentences?

1) Sorry, I can't come. We are having our examinations/tests.

2) I think, she is having a temperature/fever. She looks very down.

3) We are having a lot of rains this week.

4) We are having some beautiful weather these days.

5) I've been having recurrent nightmares after the incident.

6) I'll talk to you later. I'm having food at the moment. (telling someone on the phone)

Thanks,

Tom

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1) Sorry, I can't come. We are having our examinations/tests. (ok)

2) I think, she is having a temperature/fever. She looks very down. Emotion: no ( not used)

3) We are having a lot of rains this week. (ok)

4) We are having some beautiful weather these days. (ok)

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Mr. TomThe use of having is VERY common in Indian everyday English

Yes. It has not gone unnoticed. Emotion: smile

These are all OK, though, except 2 and 6. You can fix 6 by changing food to dinner (or lunch or breakfast, etc.).

('rain', not 'rains' in 3.)

CJ

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Comments  

Thank you AStar and CJ. One more question if I may.

Does the interrogative version of the same sentences sound equally natural to you?

1) Are you having your examinations/tests these days?

2) Are they having a lot of rain this week?

3) Are you having beautiful weather there? (on the phone)

4) Have you been having recurrent nightmares after the incident?

5) Are you having dinner at the moment?

6) Are you having trouble answering my question?

Regards,

Tom

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Mr. TomDoes the interrogative version of the same sentences sound equally natural to you?

Yes.

I'd guess that anything that works in the affirmative also works in the interrogative. Well, 99% of the time, anyway. After all, this is English, so there's bound to be an exception or two here and there.

CJ