+1

Hi

Would you say that the use of 'het-up' is natural in everyday conversation? Is it slang?

He was het-up about almost everything in the new system.

Thanks,

Tom

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I have never seen het up until now. So, is it natural in everyday English? It isn't here in Canada.

I had to use OneLook dot com (it checks several dictionaries simultaneously) to see if the word het up exists. It does, and it does not appear to be slang. The dictionaries that I consulted do not use a hyphen. It's just het up.

I hope that helps.

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As spoken English, it's natural to me in Canada. I say and hear it quite a lot.

Clive

Perhaps it’s a regional difference. I have never seen or heard the word before. That’s why I needed to check the dictionary.

http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/het%20up

It does say that it’s informal and somewhat old-fashioned.

Examples of het up in a Sentence
John can get all het up about politics.
What are you so het up about?

I have heard of head up and heads up.

Anyway, it’s good to see others have a different experience.

I participate in another forum. When we are curious about words or phrases, one participant always checks Google Books to see how often the word or phrase is used. I, on the other hand, usually check online newspapers such as the New York Times and Financial Times. While these sources are not definitive, they do provide a gauge as to how often a word or phrase is used and in what contexts. I am mentioning this so that others can do a quick check of their own for their own words.

het up

Google Books: 44,200

New York Times : 145

Financial Times: 23

With regard to the newspapers, a few recent articles have used the word het up.

I learned a new word for my vocabulary.

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