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Hi

Would you say that the use of jejune (simplistic, naive) is common among native speakers in everyday English?

Jejune ideas

Jejune opinions

Thanks,

Tom

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No, definitely not.

Clive

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Maybe I've seen it once or twice in the past 5 years. (And I read a lot!) I have never heard it used in conversation.

Juvenile and sophomoric are far more common.

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Mr. TomWould you say that the use of jejune (simplistic, naive) is common among native speakers in everyday English?

Say that to a native speaker and they'll look at you like you've got two heads — except for maybe one in five million.

Basically, it's an SAT word. That is, it only appears on the Scholastic Aptitude/Assessment Test, a college admission exam.

CJ

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The Oxford English Dictionary places "jejune" in their Frequency Band 3, "not commonly found in general text types like novels and newspapers, but at the same time … not overly opaque or obscure". Other words in that Band are "contumacious", "agglutinative", and "quantized". "Jejune" is in my active vocabulary, for what that is worth, but I would not use it unless I was talking to someone likely to know it, too, and they are pretty thin on the ground.

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Thank you Clive, AStar, CJ and Anon.

CJ, could you tell me why SAT picks such strange words for its tests? I mean, I am sure their test team consists of highly educated people. None of them objects to the inclusion of words like jejune in their books!?

Tom

Mr. TomCJ, could you tell me why SAT picks such strange words for its tests?

I suppose it's to separate the men from the boys. Whole lists of SAT words are published every year it seems, as part of SAT preparation schemes.

I don't think I regularly use more than a tiny percentage of the words in the following list in my daily conversations.

https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/191545

'jejune' isn't on that list, however.

CJ