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I get the idea but find the way keep is used here rather confusing. Shouldn't there be a passive voice or a subject used?

"... on Saturday afternoons one could buy, for a few pence, bags of unsold cakes that wouldn't keep in the shops until Monday..."
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EyeSeeYouI get the idea but find the way keep is used here rather confusing. Shouldn't there be a passive voice or a subject used?

"... on Saturday afternoons one could buy, for a few pence, bags of unsold cakes that wouldn't keep in the shops until Monday..."
I think "keep" here means "stay fresh", so the passive wouldn't make sense. It doesn't have the meaning of "being kept" on the shelves.
Comments  
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Hi,

'Keep' can mean 'stay fresh' when we are talking about food. So there's no need for the passive in your sentence, the subject is the cakes.

Another couple of examples: 'This fruit won't keep until tomorrow, so we should finish it today' or 'This bread keeps for weeks in the fridge'.

Hope that's helpful,

Seonaid
Whoops, Phillip got in before me, but nice to see we agree!