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1. He is much loved.

2. He is much interesting.

3. Your thoughts were much appreciated.

4. This is a much needed development.

5. His face is much red.

6. It was a very stimulating discussion.

7. It was a much stimulating discussion.

If 1, 3, 4, 6, why not 2, 5, 7?

MrP
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Comments  (Page 6) 
Hello MrP

I might be wrong. I searched in OED but there is no quote using <not so much Adj-1 as Adj-2>.

paco
Hello Roro

I know some past-participle-derived adjectives (especially those that do with emotions or state of mind) are modified by 'very'. My concern lies rather in a question why present-participle-derived adjectives are unexceptionally intensified by 'very', in spite of present participles being also verbal. Did it come from the French influence?

I agree with you that the adverb 'much' and 'very' are not so different in the meaning. I remember I said "mycket kallt"(much cold), "mycket bra" (much good), "mycket vackra" (much pretty) when I was in Sweden. I believe some senses of English "much" were brought in by Norse people.
paco
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Paco2004Hello MrP

I might be wrong. I searched in OED but there is no quote using <not so much Adj-1 as Adj-2>.

paco

That's an interesting omission. Or perhaps not so much interesting, as surprising.

I suppose the structure may be more characteristic of spoken English, where you have to clarify as you go along; whereas in written English, you would usually simply delete. Then again, you'd expect to find it in dialogue.

Hmm.

MrP
PS

Presumably the 'much' qualifies 'so'; or the two may function as a compound adverb, perhaps.

MrP
It's interesting that 'greatly' can serve as a near-synonym for 'much', with past participles:

1. He was greatly intrigued by the recent developments.

2. He was greatly loved by all who knew him.

3. He is greatly disliked.

But it doesn't serve for 'very':

4. ?That is greatly interesting.

'Greatly' too has the sense of 'extent' or 'quantity' (cf. Latin 'magnus').

On the other hand, there is something almost literal in the description of 'very' as an 'intensifier'

5. His face was very red ~ his face was intensely red.

Perhaps 'intensely' is to 'very' as 'greatly' is to 'much'.

(And perhaps 'greatly' is to 'intensely' as 'quantity' is to 'quality'.)

MrP
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Hello MrPedantic, hello paco.
It appears it's hard to capture the subtly encoded archetypes of 'very' and 'much'. At first I thought the difference in function is obvious. It has turned out ... that I don't know now where we're (yes, include me in) heading for...!

paco, do you speak Swedish?! Have you been there..!
So you know 'white nights', don't you............!!!
Have you seen auroras??

I envy you.

See you,
Hello MrP

I'm pursuing the exact sense of "The book is very interesting" and now pondering which of the two below is closer to it in the meaning:



  • [1] The book is a very thing that interests me.



  • [2] The book is a thing that interests me very much.
Could you give me your opinion?
paco
Hello Roro

I was in Sweden for half a year when I was a college student. It was really long long ago. Japanese people were then busy to prepare the Olympic Games in Tokyo, which I saw through TV in Stockholm. Can you guess how many years ago it was?

Yes, I experienced white nights when I stayed in the North Circle (Happaranda), but to my regret, I could not see auroras. Och jag kan tala svenska, men bara litet (=And I can speak Swedish, but only little). I learned it for survival. I worked in Stockholm for the money required to travel around Europe and return to Japan.

paco
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MrPedanticI suppose the structure may be more characteristic of spoken English, where you have to clarify as you go along; whereas in written English, you would usually simply delete.
Hello MrP again

I couldn't find any example of <not so adj-1 as adj-2>, but I am coming to feel it is correct.

My analysis is as follows.


She is not so much pretty as beautiful

= She is pretty (not so much as beautiful)

= She is pretty but not to such an extent that one can say she is beautiful.
So in this case I feel we can take 'so much' as a grade modifier of 'pretty'. Am I right?

paco
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