+0

Notice the following

(A) Shouting as they advanced, the soldiers stormed the enemy stronghold.

(B) Shouting as they advanced, the enemy stronghold was stormed by the soldiers.

The first of these groups is a good sentence; the second is not. Can you tell why?

From the following, write the good sentences only (my answers at bottom page):

1. Leaving aside his fork, the gardener wheeled his barrow from the vegetable plot.

2. Mounting his horse, the messenger rode off at top speed.

3. Feeling rested, the journey was resumed by the traveller.

4. Cycling carelessly down the street, an accident occurred.

5. Having obtained the teacher’s permission, the girls went home.

6. Having bought a ball, a game was played by the boys.

7. Rounding the bend, the castle was sighted.

8. Having settled with the bully, I continued on my way.

9. Strolling through the wood, the boy discovered an unused tunnel.

10. Mooning at her work, mistakes were made by the girl.

11. Closing the gate, the farmer drove the cattle down the lane.

Answers:

1, 2, 5, 8, 10, 12
Comments  
Here are the good ones:

1. Leaving aside his fork, the gardener wheeled his barrow from the vegetable plot.

2. Mounting his horse, the messenger rode off at top speed.

5. Having obtained the teacher’s permission, the girls went home.

8. Having settled with the bully, I continued on my way.

9. Strolling through the wood, the boy discovered an unused tunnel.

11. Closing the gate, the farmer drove the cattle down the lane.

There is no #12.
Hi Mister Micawber

My apologies for the omission. here is teh outstanding question:

12. Having worked hard, a prize was gained by the girl.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
#12 is no good either. The subject of the nonfinite clause (having...) must be the same as the main clause. This, on the other hand, is OK: [The girl] Having worked hard, the girl gained a prize.

Thank you, Mr. M.

Could it also work for other participle subordinate clauses like ones that start with '-ed'? I think there are three participles, present, past and another which I can't recall the name. I think all three can be used to start a subordinate clause. Right? For all three, if they are workable, the subject of a subordinate clause must be the same as a main clause?

eg,

Taken by surprise, Joe dashed toward the door to block the incoming intruder.
Yes, that is right-- but I cannot think of a 3rd either.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Are you perhaps thinking of the perfect form as the "third form"?

Having prepared
so long and hard for the exam, Jane was quite disappointed when she received a C.