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I believe he/his/him in red refers to Travis, and he in blue to Laird. Now, although I'm sure I'm right about it, "him" in the second line is tricky to me. Is this use of 'him' here good in terms of whether the readers could easily understand who the author is referring to? I think he'd be better off using the man's name, Travis, here. What do you think



He was used to being alone. Laird was the other surfer in his group of friends, but he hadn't gone with Travis in years. Ashley and Melinda, two former girlfriends, had gone surfing with "him" a few times in the past --- but neither ever seemed able to meet him on the spur of the moment, and typically, by the time they arrived, he was just finishing up, which threw the morning out of whack. And as usual, it had been up to him to suggest the activity in the first place. (The Choice by Nicholas Sparks)
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I would say that "him" most likely refers to Travis because he's the main character here.
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So, normally, then, if the pronouns-and-their-referents relationship is switched around, you should regard it as just for that sentence and for no further, shouldn't you?

Hiro
So, normally, then, if the pronouns-and-their-referents relationship is switched around, you should regard it as just for that sentence and for no further, shouldn't you?

I think I should phrase my question differently:

So, normally, then, if the pronouns-and-their-referents combination is changed at one point, you should regard it as just for there and for no further, shouldn't you?

Thanks.

Hiro