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Hi. Are these sentences, with either a definite article or an indefinite article, correct? Could you tell me the reasons for placing definite articles in the places indicated? By the way, would you say the phrase "most terrific" marks the superlative? I think, if I am not mistaken, the superlative has the definite article "the" in front of it.

He behaved in a (the?) most terrific manner.

(for this let us assume there is a bridge named "John Doe Bridge." I think we normally do not place a definite article in front of the name of a bridge.

He is looking at (the?) newly renovated John Doe Bridge.
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1. The definite article denotes superlatives but it's also possible to put an a before 'most terrific'. In this case the meaning changes to 'very terrific' which sounds kind of strange here but is correct grammatically.

2. As far as I know the name of a bridge usually takes a definite article before it.
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Ivanhr2. As far as I know the name of a bridge usually takes a definite article before it.
In the USA many bridges take the article, in Britain the opposite is true: London Bridge, Waterloo Bridge. The attribute before the name of the bridge in the original poster's question justifies the article.

CB