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Hello, experts!

Thank you for reading this, first of all.

I'm having trouble making myself understood about the meaning of the verb, 'harm'.

Can you help?

The intended sentence is like this :

1) All attempts to harm the core value of fair competition, through technology doping giving an unfair advantage, should be forbidden in all sports competitions.


How about the following sentence? Could the following have the same meaning as the intended sentence above? What do you make of the following? The following seems to be very far from the original sentence to me.

Besides I think, in the following case, the verb 'harm' involves physical damage. Correct me if I'm wrong, please. I'm a forever learner of English so I am asking for your opionion as a native speaker.


The problematic sentence :

2) All attempts to harm athletes who train day and night, through technology doping giving an unfair advantage, should be forbidden in all sports competitions.


Thank you for your patience and time.

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hohok2) All attempts to harm athletes who train day and night, through technology doping giving an unfair advantage, should be forbidden in all sports competitions.

"harm" here presumably means harm these honest athletes' chances of winning, or doing well in competition, not cause them physical damage.

Comments  
hohokThank you for reading this, first of all.

No problem. It's what I do.

hohok1) All attempts to harm the core value of fair competition, through technology doping giving an unfair advantage, should be forbidden in all sports competitions.

This sentence is oddly put, but I don't see a problem with "harm". It is quite a broadly applicable word. You can harm a value, but I think there must be a better way to put it, like maybe "violate" or "erode".

hohok2) All attempts to harm athletes who train day and night, through technology doping giving an unfair advantage, should be forbidden in all sports competitions.

"Harm" is not so good here because, as you say, the reader sees harming an athlete as a physical act, and because you need to be more specific. Maybe "cheat".

By the way, sometimes "to do harm to" is better than a bare "harm". Doping does harm to the core values of sports, those of fairness and amity.