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The environment ministry, in the pandemic, has been helping green companies enter markets overseas by helping them with the cost of self-isolation when their staff visit other countries and providing non-face-to-face communication platforms. Their overseas orders were up about 5 percent from the year before.

I know that the speech part of overseas is an adjective and an adverb

And then I was wondering if the speech part of it is an adverb or adjective in the article.

If it is an adjective, I think it should be overseas markets or is it used as an adverb there?

What do you native English speakers think? Thank you so much as usual in advance.

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Here "overseas" can be understood as modifying either "markets" (telling us what kind of markets) or "enter" (telling us where they enter the markets). In the former case I would call it an adjective, and in the latter case it is an adverb. In the former sense, "markets overseas" means the same as "overseas markets", i.e. both meaning "markets that are located overseas".

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Overseas is used both as an adjective (placed before a noun) or an adverb (after the noun).

The former is far more common. And it is naturally used with a verb as an adverb.

When I lived overseas, I enjoyed travelling.
The president repealed the tax break that rewards companies that move jobs overseas.
Overseas automakers have lower labor costs than domestic ones.