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Hi

He helped me to learn/learn French.

I have a question on the use of the verb "help" here.

I think verb help is used with or without to.

My question is can we use it either of them in all situation?

I remember reading somewhere that when the help was sought in the actual performance of the action, help is without "to" (bare infinitive), and if it is the guidance taken prior to the actual performance of the action, help is with used with to (to infinitive)

She helped me cross the road—she walked along with me.

She helped me to pass the exam—she taught him very well.

Please give your views.

Suresh

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When in doubt, use 'to'.

It takes hardly any time to type or say and will always be right.

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vsureshMy question is can we use [it] either of them in all situations?

Yes. At least I don't know of any exceptions.

vsureshI remember reading somewhere that when the help was sought in the actual performance of the action, help is without "to" (bare infinitive), and if it is the guidance taken prior to the actual performance of the action, help is with used with to (to infinitive).

I've never heard this view, but it might take an examination of hundreds of examples to see if it's true, so I'll leave that as an exercise for someone else. Emotion: wink

CJ

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Comments  
Rover_KEIt takes hardly any time to type or say and will always be right.

Thank you, Rover_KE

I will.

I wanted to know if the reason(I have mentioned in my post) for using help without 'to' is a native idea.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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CalifJimI've never heard this view

OK. Thank you, CJ.

Suresh